March 30, 2015 Day 70 of the Seventh Year - History

March 30, 2015 Day 70 of the Seventh Year - History



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Vicki Kennedy shows President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama a replica of the Senate office of the late Senator Ted Kennedy during the dedication of the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate in Boston, Mass., March 30, 2015.


9:15AM THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY depart the White House
South Lawn

9:30AM THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY depart Joint Base Andrews

10:50AM THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY arrives Boston, MA
Boston Logan International Airport

11:25AM THE PRESIDENT delivers remarks at the opening of the Edward M. Kennedy Institute; THE FIRST LADY and THE VICE PRESIDENT also attend
Edward M. Kennedy Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

1:20PM THE PRESIDENT participates in a DNC roundtable
Area Four, Boston, Massachusetts

2:55PM THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY depart Boston, MA
Boston Logan International Airport

4:20PM THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY arrive Joint Base Andrews

4:35PM THE PRESIDENT and THE FIRST LADY arrive the White House


Tax Freedom Day® 2015 is April 24th

Tax Freedom Day is the day when the nation as a whole has earned enough money to pay its total tax bill for the year. Tax Freedom Day takes all federal, state, and local taxes and divides them by the nation&rsquos income. In 2015, Americans will pay $3.28 trillion in federal taxes and $1.57 trillion in state and local taxes, for a total tax bill of $4.85 trillion, or 31 percent of national income. This year, Tax Freedom Day falls on April 24, or 114 days into the year.

What Taxes Do We Pay?

This year, Americans will work the longest to pay federal, state, and local individual income taxes (43 days). Payroll taxes will take 26 days to pay, followed by sales and excise taxes (15 days), corporate income taxes (12 days), and property taxes (11 days). The remaining 7 days are spent paying estate and inheritance taxes, customs duties, and other taxes.

Why Is Tax Freedom Day Later This Year?

Tax Freedom Day is one day later than last year due mainly to the country&rsquos continued steady economic growth. Higher wages and corporate profits are expected to boost tax revenue from the corporate, payroll, and individual income taxes.

When Is Tax Freedom Day if You Include Federal Borrowing?

Since 2002, federal expenses have surpassed federal revenues, with the budget deficit exceeding $1 trillion annually from 2009 to 2012 and over $800 billion in 2013. In 2015, the deficit will continue to decline to $580 billion. If we include this annual federal borrowing, which represents future taxes owed, Tax Freedom Day would occur on May 8, 14 days later. The latest ever deficit-inclusive Tax Freedom Day occurred during World War II on May 25, 1945.

When Is My State&rsquos Tax Freedom Day?

The total tax burden borne by residents of different states varies considerably due to differing state tax policies and the progressivity of the federal tax system. This means a combination of higher-income and higher-tax states celebrate Tax Freedom Day later: Connecticut (May 13), New Jersey (May 13), and New York (May 8). Residents of Louisiana will bear the lowest average tax burden in 2015, with Tax Freedom Day arriving for them on April 2. Also early are Mississippi (April 4) and South Dakota (April 8).

How Has Tax Freedom Day Changed over Time?

The latest ever Tax Freedom Day was May 1, 2000, meaning Americans paid 33 percent of their total income in taxes that year. A century earlier, in 1900, Americans paid only 5.9 percent of their income in taxes, meaning Tax Freedom Day came on January 22. The last time Tax Freedom Day was this late in the year was 2007 (April 25).

Methodology

In the denominator, we count every dollar that is officially part of national income according to the Department of Commerce&rsquos Bureau of Economic Analysis. In the numerator, we count every payment to the government that is officially considered a tax. Taxes at all levels of government&mdashfederal, state, and local&mdashare included in the calculation. In calculating Tax Freedom Day for each state, we look at taxes borne by residents of that state, whether paid to the federal government, their own state or local governments, or governments of other states. Where possible, we allocate tax burdens to the taxpayer&rsquos state of residence. Leap days are excluded to allow comparison across years, and any fraction of a day is rounded up to the next calendar day.


March 30, 2015 Day 70 of the Seventh Year - History

Watergate. The end of Vietnam. Normal relations with China. Earth Day. It was a nation in flux, one turning in small measures to a computer age, even if that computer was originally the size of a house.

More 1900s


With the Senate vote in 1978 to return the Panama Canal back to Panama in 1999, the one hundred year history of Washington's involvement in the canal would come to an end. Photo: Panama Canal workers, circa 1906.


Check out the Spotlights on History you may not know about, our monthly feature at America's Best History.

Baseball History


For the history of baseball, check out our friends at Stat Geek Baseball and Baseballevaluation where they put the stats from 1871 to today in context.

ABH Travel Tip


A visit to a Presidential Library can be an enlightening experience, allowing the historic tourist to emerse yourself in the life of a president, as well as the era of his presidency. One of the truly remarkable ones is the Lincoln Presidential Museum and Library in Springfield, Missouri.

Photo above: President Richard Nixon. Courtesy National Archives. Right: Statue of Secretariat at Belmont Park, 2014, courtesy Wikipedia Commons.

U.S. Timeline - The 1970s

Sponsor this page for $225 per year. Your banner or text ad can fill the space above.
Click here to Sponsor the page and how to reserve your ad.

August 12, 1970 - The United States Postal Service is made independent in a postal reform measure for the first time in almost two centuries.

Buy Chronology


Great Book for the History Fan with Fifty Short Essays Telling the Story of American History.

January 2, 1971 - A ban on the television advertisement of cigarettes goes into affect in the United States.

February 8, 1971 - A forty-four day raid into Laos by South Vietnamese soldiers is begun with the aid of United States air and artillery.

September 17, 1971 - The advent of the microprocessor age at Texas Instruments includes the introduction of the 4-bit TMS 1000 with a calculator on the chip on November 15, 1971, Intel released the 4-bit 4004 microprocessor developed by Federico Faggin. It is unknown whose chip predated the other in the laboratory environment.

February 21, 1972 - The journey for peace trip of the U.S. President to Peking, China begins. The eight day journey by Richard M. Nixon and meetings with Mao Zedong, unprecedented at the time, began the process for normalization of relations with China.

March 30, 1972 - The largest attacks by North Vietnam troops across the demilitarized zone in four years prompts bombing raids to begin again by United States forces against Hanoi and Haiphong on April 15, ending a four year cessation of those raids.

November 7, 1972 - In one of the most lopsided races in American Presidential election history, incumbent President Richard M. Nixon beat his Democratic challenger George S. McGovern, winning 520 Electoral College votes to McGovern's 17, and taking over 60% of the popular vote. This election, however, would be the beginning of the end for the presidency of Richard M. Nixon, once the Watergate affair brought question into the tactics within the election process.


March 30, 2015 Day 70 of the Seventh Year - History

The Carl Vinson (CVN 70) is the third United States Navy Nimitz-class aircraft carrier and is named after Carl Vinson, a Congressman from Georgia.

March 13, 1982 USS Carl Vinson was commissioned during a ceremony at Newort News Shipbuilding and Drydock Corp. in Newport News, Va. Mrs. Molly Snead is the sponsor of the ship. Capt. Richard L. Martin is the first commanding officer.

March 15, The Vinson arrived at Norfolk Naval Station in Norfolk, Va. On 18th departed for its first operational sea period and conducted flight deck certifications and initial F/A-18 Hornet sea trials from March 22- April 2. Cmdr. Stephen C. Wood, the CO of Air Anti-Submarine Squadron (VS) 32, logged the ship&rsquos first arrested landing, in a Lockheed S-3A Viking.

May 17, USS Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, for a three-day port visit Anchored off Bridgetown, Barbados, from May 23-25.

June 21, The Carl Vinson departed homeport for final contract trials Underway for Reserve Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 20 carrier qualifications, in the Virginia Capes Op. Area, on July 7.

On August 2, the Carl Vinson returned to Newort News Shipbuilding for a Post Shakedown Availability (PSA) and entered the dry-dock on Sept. 11 Underway for sea trials on Dec. 11 Moored at Pier 2 on Naval Station Norfolk, after onloaded more than 2,000 tons or ordnance, on Dec. 15.

On January 30, 1983, The Vinson anchored in Roosevelt Roards, Puerto Rico, where diverers photographed the #2 screw and discovered several cracks on the edges of the blades Returned to Norfolk on Feb. 4 Entered the dry-dock at Newport News on Feb. ?.

May 1, USS Carl Vinson departed Norfolk for around-the-world cruise and a homeport change to Alameda, Calif.

From March 4-16, the Vinson conducted drills and exercises in the Puerto Rican Op. Area in support of READEX and in preparation for Operational Readiness Evaluation (ORE).

March 28, USS Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of Monte Carlo, Monaco, for its first port visit.

April 14, CVN 70 pulled into Casablanca, Morocco, for a three-day port call after participating in a multinational NATO exercise National Week.

April 23, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier arrived in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, for a four-day port visit.

July 1, USS Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of Fremantle, Australia, for a six-day liberty visit to Perth.

July 26, An A-7E Corsair II from Attack Squadron (VA) 37 hit a ramp during a night landing and went off the angled deck into the water. The pilot ejected safely and was picked up 16 minutes later.

July 30, Capt. Thomas A. Mercer relieved Capt. Richard L. Martin as commanding officer of the Carl Vinson.

September 7, USS Carl Vinson arrived at Naval Air Station Cubi Point in Subic Bay, Philippines, for a ten-day upkeep period.

September 21, CVN 70 anchored off the coast of Hong Kong for a five-day port call before participating in ANNUALEX 58G exercise Inport Sasebo, Japan, from Oct. 1-4.

October 6, USS Carl Vinson arrived in Busan, Republic of Korea, for a four-day port visit.

October 28, USS Carl Vinson moored at Pier 3 in its new homeport of Naval Air Station Alameda, Calif., after a "Tiger Cruise" from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, completing the six-month maiden deployment.

In 1984, the Carl Vinson received the highest marks ever awarded an aircraft carrier during an operational readiness examination in February Underway for Refresher Training in the SOCAL Op. Area from March 19- April 6.

May 14, USS Carl Vinson departed homeport for a nine-day COMPUTEX Participated in a multinational exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) '84, from May 31- June 18 Underway for READIEX 84-4/ORE from July 31- Aug. 22 Underway for Dependent's Day Cruise on Aug. 23.

October 13, 1984 USS Carl Vinson departed Alameda, Calif., for a scheduled deployment.

December 10, The Carl Vinson arrived in Yokosuka, Japan, for a two-day port call.

December 17, USS Carl Vinson anchored in Victoria Harbor for a five-day liberty visit to Hong Kong.

December 24, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier moored at Leyte Pier in NAS Cubi Point, Subic Bay, Philippines, for a 10-day upkeep.

From January 11, 1985, through April 12, the Vinson was deployed in the Indian Ocean/North Arabian Sea for 107 consecutive days at sea operations.

April 19, The Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of Fremantle, Australia, for a week-long port visit Inport Subic Bay again from May 3-6.

May 24, USS Carl Vinson returned to homeport after a six-day Tiger Cruise from Hawaii, completing an extended deployment in the 5th and 7th Fleet Areas of Responsibility (AoR).

On October 7, the Vinson was underway again for Air Wing carrier qualifications off the coast of southern California after a two-month Selected Restricted Availability (SRA) Underway for Pre-refresher training (REFTRA) from Oct. 29- Nov. 8 Underway for Interim Refresher Training from Nov. 12-22 Completed INSURV on Dec. 6.

January 6, 1986 USS Carl Vinson departed NAS Alameda for a week-long Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ) Completed another two-month SRA upkeep period on March 12.

March 20, Capt. George D. O'Brien, Jr., relieved Capt. Thomas A. Mercer as the 3rd CO of "Gold Eagle."

March 26, An F-14A was lost at sea after entered a flat spin during a training mission. The crew ejected safely.

April 6, While launching from Catapult No. 3 an Intruder&rsquos (VA-52) jet blast blew final checker AD2 Brian L. Preston of that squadron overboard portside, at 1435, while the Vinson was underway 245 n.m. off the coast of Isla Guadalupe. A taxiing Corsair II&rsquos blast blew Preston behind the Intruder, that in turn thrust him over the side. Although USS O&rsquoCallahan (FF-1051) lowered a motor whaleboat that recovered the sailor, however, he died at 16:45 on board the frigate.

April 15, USS Carl Vinson returned to homeport after a 33-day underway for CQ and READIEX 86-3, with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 15, in the SOCAL Op. Area.

May 16, The Carl Vinson pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for an 11-day port call before participating in RIMPAC '86 exercise Inport Pearl Harbor again from June 18-25 Returned to Alameda on July 2.

August 12, USS Carl Vinson departed homeport for its second western Pacific/Indian Ocean deployment.

From August 18-26, the Carl Vinson was underway in the Bering Sea, becoming the first aircraft carrier to operate for an extended period here since WW2.

August 16, The Vinson just completed an underway replenishment during the afternoon watch when a huge wave slammed into Elevator No. 1, positioned at the Hangar Bay level about 25 feet above the sea, and swept seven men overboard at 12:43. Six were saved by USS Paul F. Foster. An SH-3H from HS-4, rescued the seventh man. The wave injured an eighth sailor when it smashed him against an aircraft.

September 1, CVN 70 arrived in Busan, Republic of Korea, for a four-day port call Inport Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines, from Sept. 12-18.

September 18, An A-6E Intruder (#512) rolled over an ordnanceman&rsquos leg, while under tow, during a flight deck re-spot at 14:05. The AO lost his leg due to the accident.

September 23, USS Carl Vinson anchored at Marina Bay for a five-day visit to Singapore. While en route, a major casualty ocurred on #4 aircraft elevator.

October 5, The Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of Diego Garcia for a six-day visit to the British Indian Ocean Teritories.

October 17, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Masirah, Oman, for a four-day stop Anchored off Masirah again from Oct. 30- Nov. 2 Anchored off Karachi, Pakistan, from Nov. 7-11.

November 17, USS Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of Mombasa, Kenya, for a six-day port visit Anchored off Diego Garcia again for upkeep from Nov. 29- Dec. 6.

December 19, The Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of Fremantle, Australia, for a week-long liberty visit to Perth.

December 29, An A-7E Corsair, assigned to the Attack Squadron (VA) 97, experienced a malfunction as its flap handle stuck in the isolation mode, causing the brakes to fail, and skidded over the port side at 15:17. Lt. Kevin H. Graffis ejected and a Sea King from HS-4 rescued him.

January 5, 1987 USS Carl Vinson arrived again in Singapore for a six-day port visit.

February 5, USS Carl Vinson returned to Naval Air Station Alameda after a six-month deployment.

March 16, The Carl Vinson departed homeport for a two-day friends and family cruise.

March 24, The Carl Vinson entered the dry-dock at Hunter&rsquos Point Naval Shipyard for a Drydock Selected Restricted Availability (DSRA) Undocked and moored at Pier 3 on NAS Alameda on July 3.

September 20, An F-14A Tomcat of VF-111 went over the port side at 19:47 local time after Purchase Cable #4 snapped, while attempting to land during carrier qualifications off the coast of southern Californian. Lt. John G. Speer and Lt. Michael D. Conn ejected safely.

September 23, An A-6E Intruder, assigned to the Attack Squadron (VA) 52, crashed near Santa Catalina Island while flying ashore to NAS Whidbey Island, Wash., overnight. The pilot Cmdr. Loyd D. Sledge died and the bombardier/navigator survived.

October 2, USS Carl Vinson departed Alameda for an eight-day underway to conduct Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ).

February 11, 1988 CVN 70 returned to homeport after a 17-day underway for Advance Training Assessment and CQ with the CVW-15 Underway for FRS-CQ and ORSE from Feb. 23- March 9.

March 28, USS Carl Vinson departed homeport for Comprehensive Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) 88-2 Underway for CQ with the CVW-15 from June 6-8.

June 15, USS Carl Vinson departed Naval Air Station Alameda for a scheduled deployment.

From June 21-22, the Carl Vinson conducted interoperability evolutions with the U.S. Air Force, in Alaskan waters.

July 8, CVN 70 moored at NAS Cubi Point for a six-day visit to Subic Bay, Philippines Inport Singapore from July 18-21.

July 28, USS Carl Vinson relieved USS Forrestal (CV 59) on station in the North Arabian Sea Anchored off the coast of Masirah, Oman, on Sept. 3.

September 8, An F-14A, assigned to the Fighter Squadron (VF) 111, spiraled out of control during air combat maneuvering at 18:11, about 46 n.m. from the carrier. Lt. Jay A. Abrams and Lt. Cmdr. Mark A. Bruder safely ejected and were recovered.

September 26, An F-14A from VF-111 experienced an in-flight environmental control system fire and subsequent loss of flight controls at 13:55. Lt. Cmdr. Randal C. Sweeney and Lt. Michael S. Helwig ejected and rescued within an hour.

While on station, the "Gold Eagle" supported for 82 days the escorting of American flagged tankers in the Arabian Gulf. Ongoing Iraqi and Iranian attacks against tankers steaming in the region threatened freedom of navigation during the war between the two countries, and the U.S.-authorized Operation Earnest Will to maintain the sea lanes.

October 10, The Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of Mombasa, Kenya, for a six-day port visit.

November 4, CVN 70 anchored off the coast of Pattaya Beach, Thailand, for a five-day liberty port visit Inport Hong Kong from Nov. 13-18 Inport Subic Bay from Nov. 20-23.

December 6, The Carl Vinson pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a two-day port visit and to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise.

December 16, USS Carl Vinson returned to NAS Alameda, after a one-day delay due to high winds, following a six-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet AoR.

January 25, 1989 The Vinson departed homeport for an eight-day underway to conduct Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ).

April 14, Capt. Doyle J. Borchers, II relieved Capt. George D. O'Brien, Jr., as commanding officer of the USS Carl Vinson.

May 1, The third Nimitz-class aircraft carrier departed homeport for Independent Steaming Operations, following a three-month availability Underway for routine training from May 12-2? Conducted INSURV inspection from June 11-16.

July 24, An F-14A, assigned to the Fighter Squadron (VF) 51, crashed off the coast of San Clemente Island after MP/RIO failed to maintain proper instrument scan in IMC during critical phase of flight causing engine compressor stall. The crew ejected safely.

August 2, An F-14A, assigned to the Fighter Squadron (VF) 111, suffered an in-flight fire at 18:30 that caused a loss of flight hydraulics, forcing the aircrew to eject. A helo rescued both men approximately six miles from NAS North Island.

August 19, USS Carl Vinson departed NAS Alameda for a Dependent's Day Cruise Underway for Phase I of PACEX '89, from Sept. 5-14.

September 18, The Carl Vinson departed Naval Air Station Alameda to participate in Phase II, III and IV of PACEX '89, the largest peacetime naval exercise since World War II, in the Bering Sea.

From October 14-21, the Carl Vinson participated in Operation Valiant Blitz in the waters of the Korean Penninsula. She steamed as part of a formation of 48 ships, including USS Enterprise (CVN 65), USS Missouri (BB 63) and USS New Jersey (BB 62).

October 22, USS Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of Busan, Republic of Korea, for a four-day port visit.

October 31, DCFN Donald Evans was lost at sea after a rogue wave swept over three sailors on the port aft weather deck, while the carrier plowed through 12-foot seas about 600 miles north of Wake Island.

November 8, The Carl Vinson moored at Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego for a brief visit to offload Air Wing due to the Oct. 17 San Francisco Earthquake Returned to Alameda on Nov. 9.

February 1, 1990 USS Carl Vinson departed NAS Alameda for its fifth deployment to the western Pacific and Indian Ocean.

From February 4-10, the Vinson participated in READIEX 89-5B exercise, while en route to the Hawaiian waters Inport Pearl Harbor from Feb. 15-17.

March 4, USS Carl Vinson pulled into Sasebo, Japan, for a two-day port call after participated in Phase I of exercise Team Spirit '90 with the ROK and Japan Navy Participated in Phase II from March 7-18.

March 24, The Carl Vinson moored to Alava Pier, NAS Cubi Point in Subic Bay for a 12-day upkeep Moored at Changi Naval Base, Singapore, for upkeep from April 14-21 Anchored off Diego Garcia from April 30- May 2.

Until the end of May, the Vinson operated in the North Arabian Sea with Combined Joint Task Force Middle East. The ship conducted a variety of exercises, twice anchoring off Masirah (May 13-14 and May 24-25).

June 12, USS Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of Fremantle, Australia, for a six-day liberty port visit to Perthl Inport Subic Bay again from June 28- July 1.

July 3, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored in Victoria Harbour for a six-day liberty port visit to Hong Kong Inport Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, to embark 850 male "Tigers" from July 21-23.

July 31, USS Carl Vinson returned to NAS Alameda following a six-month deployment.

September 15, The Carl Vinson departed Alameda, Calif., for a two-year Complex Overhaul (COH).

September 17, CVN 70 moored at Naval Weapons Station Indian Island, Wash., to offload 2,900 tons of ammunition.

September 22, The Carl Vinson moored at Pier 3 on Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in Bremerton, Washington Entered the Dry Dock #6 on Sept. 29.

November 15, 1991 USS Carl Vinson undocked and moored at Pier 3 on PSNS to continue its overhaul.

March 28, 1992 Capt. John S. Payne relieved Capt. Doyle J. Borchers, II as commanding officer of the Carl Vinson.

April 15, 1993 The Carl Vinson returned to Naval Air Station Alameda following a 30-month, $300 million worth, overhaul.

May 10, The "Gold Eagle" departed NAS North Island after a three-day port call for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) I/II Moored again at NAS North Island on May 24 Underway for FRS-CQ and TSTA IV Returned home on June 2.

From June 23- July 2, the Vinson conducted Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) III off the coast of southern California Underway for TSTA IV and FRS-CQ from July 7-16.

July 27, USS Carl Vinson moored at Ammunition Pier, Naval Magazine Indian Island in Port Townsend, Wash., for a one-day stop to embark nearly 2,000 people en route to Seattle Harbor for Sea Fair celebration Moored at NWS Indian Island again from Aug. 2-4 Returned home on Aug. 6.

August 9, USS Carl Vinson departed NAS Alameda for a Dependent's Day Cruise Underway for TSTA IV and FRS-CQ from Aug. 19-2? Underway for Comprehensive Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) on Oct. 1.

October 26, CVN 70 departed NAS North Island after a four-day port call to participate in FLEETEX 94-1A. The Vinson operated with the USS Peleliu (LHA 5) Amphibious Ready Group (ARG), off the coast of southern California, through Nov. 8 Underway again for FLEETEX 94-1B/C from Nov. 30- Dec. 12.

February 17, 1994 USS Carl Vinson departed Alameda for a scheduled deployment in support of Operation Southern Watch.

February 22, An F-14D, assigned to the Fighter Squadron (VF) 11, lose power in its right engine, burn and crash into the sea after reaching a speed of 635 knots, around 14:00, some 1400 miles east of Oahu. Lt. Richard H. Lucas and Lt. Jeffrey W. Strobel safely ejected.

February 26, The Carl Vinson pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a two-day port call Inport Yokosuka, Japan, from March 11-14.

March 19, USS Carl Vinson arrived in Hong Kong for a four-day liberty visit after participating in a five-day exercise with the Japanese Self-Defense Force (JSDF).

March 28, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier arrived in Singapore for a five-day port call after participated in exercise Mergate 94-2.

April 16, USS Carl Vinson transited the Strait of Hormuz northbound and for the first time entered the Arabian Gulf in support of Operation Southern Watch. The UN established a no-fly zone along the 32nd parallel after the Iraqis renewed attacks against Shiite Muslims in August 1992, and the coalition began patrolling this no-fly zone Participated in exercise Initial Link from April 20-25 and Red Reef V from April 21-27.

May 7, The Carl Vinson pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day liberty port visit to Dubai.

May 25, USS Carl Vinson arrived in Jebel Ali for another four days of R&R after participating in exercise Inspired Alert and GULFEX XXIV Inport Jebel Ali again from June 11-14, after Iron Siren, Nauticus Artist and Beacon Flash exercises.

July 5, The Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of Fremantle, Australia, for a four-day liberty port visit to Perth.

July 17, CVN 70 anchored off the coast Hobart, Tasmania, for a five-day liberty port visit, the first by U.S. aircraft carrier since 1977.

August 4, The "Gold Eagle" pulled into Pearl Harbor for a three-day port vist and to embark over 900 friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise.

August 17, USS Carl Vinson returned to Naval Air Station Alameda after a six-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet AoR. Aircraft from CVW-14 flew 1,243 combat sorties in support of operation Southern Watch.

September 22, CVN 70 departed homeport for Training Carrier Qualifications (CNATRA), off the coast of southern California, the first with the new T-45A Goshawk Departed NAS North Island, San Diego, for INSURV on Sept. 30 Returned to Alameda on Oct. 2.

October 7, Capt. Larry C. Baucom relieved Capt. John S. Payne as commanding officer of the USS Carl Vinson.

February 21, 1995 The Carl Vinson departed NAS Alameda for five-day sea trials and FDC, following a five-month Ship&rsquos Restricted Availability (SRA).

April 10, USS Carl Vinson departed homeport for four-day underway to conduct CQ Underway for INSURV inspection from April 18-25 Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on May 12.

May 17, An F/A-18D, assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 125, crashed in North New Mexico around 10:05, during a training flight from NAS Lemoore, Calif., to St. Louis, Missouri. On May 18 the Air Force Sikorsky MH-53J Pave Low III discovered the Hornet&rsquos wreckage at about 9,700 feet, strewn across three miles of Mogote Ridge, a rugged peak east of Canjilon. Rear Adm. James G. Prout, III, Commander, Carl Vinson Battle Group and Cmdr. Joseph G. Kleefisch, the CO of VFA-25, were killed.

June 5, The Carl Vinson departed homeport for an 11-day underway to conduct Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) I/II and CQ with the CVW-14 Underway for TSTA IV and training CQ from July 10-17.

August 21, USS Carl Vinson departed Alameda to participate in exercise Ke Koa and the commemoration of the end of World War II in the Pacific. On Aug. 29, the 11 historic warplanes from WWII were launched from the flight deck, while transiting of the coast of Waikiki, Hawaii Departed Pearl Harbor on Sept. 6 Returned home on Sept. 13.

October 6, The Vinson departed homeport to participate in Fleet Week, '95, launching World War II aircraft, in the San Francisco Bay area. An F/A-18 Hornet and F-14 Tomcat, and an unprecedented launch and recovery of an S-3 Viking on the next day as the carrier returned to port in preparation for the "Open House" on Oct. 8 Underway for ammo onload on Oct. 17.

November 13, CVN 70 departed NAS Alameda for a week-long underway to participate in Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) III/FEP Underway for a COMPTUEX 96-1A from Nov. 24- Dec. 2?.

From February 14-16, 1996, the Carl Vinson participated in SACCEX with the USS Tarawa (LHA 1) Amphibious Ready Group.

February 18, An F/14D, assigned to Fighter Squadron (VF) 11 detonated near the carrier's starboard side after one engine was suddenly set on fire, while conducting a simulated anti-ship-attack. Cmdr. L. Scott Lamoreaux was killed.

March 5, The "Gold Eagle" departed homeport for a two-week Joint Tactical Fleet Exercise (JTFEX) Underway for CQ with the CVW-14 from April 15-19.

May 14, USS Carl Vinson departed Alameda for a scheduled deployment to the western Pacific and Arabian Gulf.

May 30, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier pulled into Yokosuka Naval Base, Japan, for a two-day port call.

June 7, USS Carl Vinson anchored in Victoria Harbour for a five-day liberty port visit to Hong Kong Inport Singapore from June 17-21.

July 1, The Carl Vinson entered the Arabian Gulf after transiting Strait of Hormuz northbound Commenced sorties in support of Operation Southern Watch on July 5 Participated in a short notice exercise Rugged Nautilus from July 18-26.

July 27, USS Carl Vinson pulled into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a four-day liberty port visit to Dubai Anchored off the coast of Muscat, Oman, from Aug. 17-21.

From September 3-4, the aircraft from CVW-14 participated in Operation Desert Strike in Iraq.

September 15, USS Carl Vinson anchored at Bahrain Bell for a three-day port visit to Manama Departed Arabian Gulf on Oct. 2. Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 14 flew a total of 1,893 sorties and 5,183 flight hours support of Operation Southern Watch.

October 20, The Carl Vinson anchored off the coast Hobart, Australia, for a five-day port visit Inport Pearl Harbor from Nov. 3-8.

November 14, USS Carl Vinson returned to NAS Alameda after a six-month deployment.

January 17, 1997 USS Carl Vinson, commanded by Capt. David M. Crocker, arrived at its new homeport of Naval Station Bremerton, Wash., after a three-day transit from Alameda, Calif.

On February 13, the CVN 70 added another chapter in the history of naval aviation as the platform for the last carrier launches and recoveries of the A-6E intruder.

September 10, The Carl Vinson departed Bremerton for sea trials after completing a six-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Underway for flight deck certification and carrier qualifications with the CVW-11 from Sept. 22-29 Underway for CQ again from Oct. 20-23 and Nov. 3-13 Underway for CQ and Operational Reactor Safeguard Examination (ORSE) from Dec. 3-11.

January 26, 1998 The Carl Vinson departed homeport for FRS-CQ and TSTA I off the coast of southern California Returned to Bremerton on Feb. 7 Underway for Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) II, III and Final Evaluation Phase (FEP) on Feb. 22.

March 14, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier departed Naval Air Station North Island for a COMPTUEX(A) Moored at NAS North Island again in late March Underway for Intermediate Training Assessment (ITA) from April 1-3 Returned to Bremerton on April 9.

April 29, USS Carl Vinson departed homeport for Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ) off the coast of southern California Moored at NAS North Island to commence INSURV on May 7 Returned home on May 12 Underway for Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the CVW-11 on June 22.

July 6, USS Carl Vinson pulled into Naval Station Pearl Harbor for a four-day port call before participating in JTFEX/FLEETEX that was embedded into world's largest international maritime exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) '98 Inport Pearl Harbor again from Aug. 2-6 Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Aug. 1? Underway for ammo onload with the USS Mount Hood (AE 29) from Aug. 24-27 Underway for CVW-11 CQ and Battle Group operations, in the SOCAL Op. Area, from Sept 11-29.

November 6, USS Carl Vinson departed Naval Station Bremerton for a scheduled deployment to the western Pacific and Arabian Gulf.

November 29, The Carl Vinson anchored in Victoria Harbour for a four-day liberty port visit to Hong Kong Inport Singapore from Dec. 7-11.

December 19, The aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 pounded nearly 50 targets in a half dozen Iraqi military sites in the southern part of the country in 14 strikes, using about 20 precision-guided and 60 laser-guided munitions. Following fourth and final day of Operation Desert Fox, the Battle Group settled into a combat routine supporting Operation Southern Watch, enforcing the Southern No-Fly Zone in Iraq and conducting Maritime Interception Operations.

December 25, The Vinson recently anchored off Sitrah, Bahrain, for a liberty port visit to Manama.

February 7, 1999 USS Carl Vinson pulled into Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day liberty port visit to Dubai.

March 22, The Carl Vinson transited the Strait of Hormuz southbound after steaming more than 17,000 n.m. in the Arabian Gulf. Aircraft from CVW-11 completed 8698 sorties and 17,398.3 flight hours with a 94.7 percent completion rate.

March 29, USS Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of Fremantle, Australia, for a five-day liberty port visit to Perth.

April 7, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored off the coast of Hobart, Tasmania, for a five-day port visit.

May 6, USS Carl Vinson returned to Bremerton afrer a six-month deployment.

August 4, USS Carl Vinson moored at Ammunition Pier, Naval Magazine Indian Island for a brief stop to embark 2,200 guests, while en route to Seattle for the annual Seafair celebration Moored at Pier 37 in Port of Seattle from Aug. 4-8.

In August, CVN 70 entered the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for a 10-month Drydocked Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA).

In June 2000, USS Carl Vinson finished the overhaul period and began the pre-deployment phase of operations. The aircraft carrier got underway for sea trials, TSTA and FEP in the fall, operating off the coast of southern California with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 11 and other ships in the battlegroup.

From February 5-9, 2001, the Twentieth Century Fox "Behind Enemy Lines" shooting was conducted on board the "Gold Eagle," while underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ) off the coast of southern California Underway for COMPTUEX from Feb. 12 through March 1.

March 7, USS Carl Vinson completed the onload of more than 1,875 tons of ammunition during a four-day underway with the USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), in the SOCAL Op. Area.

July 23, USS Carl Vinson departed Naval Station Bremerton for a scheduled Arabian Gulf deployment.

From August 12-13, the aircraft from CVW-11 practiced bombing runs on Farallon de Medinilla, approximately 45 n.m. from Saipan in the Northern Marianas.

August 21, The nuclear-powered aircraft carrier anchored in the Gulf of Thailand for a five-day liberty visit to Pattaya Beach.

August 29, The Carl Vinson moored at Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a five-day port visit Arrived on station in the North Arabian Sea on Sept. 12.

October 6, Capt. Richard B. Wren relieved Capt. Bruce W. Clingan as CO of the Carl Vinson during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship at sea.

October 7, USS Carl Vinson launched the first strikes in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, the opening phases of the "Global War on Terrorism," against al Qaeda terrorists and their Taliban supporters in Afghanistan.

During the 70 days in support of OEF, the aircraft from CVW-11 launched more than 8,000 fixed-wing aircraft, flew 4,200 combat sorties and droped more than 2 million pounds of ordnance.

December 23, USS Carl Vinson moored again at Changi Naval Base, after 111 consecutive days at sea, for a three-day liberty port visit to Singapore.

January 8, 2002 CVN 70 pulled into Pearl Harbor for a six-day port call and to embark 975 family members for a Tiger Cruise.

January 19, USS Carl Vinson returned to Bremerton after a six-month combat deployment.

September 9, The Carl Vinson returned to Naval Station Bremerton after a three-day underway for sea trials, completing the five-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNSY). Several new operational systems were installed, and the ship's flight deck and catapults were completely renovated. Numerous other spaces and crew living areas were also entirely restored, drastically improving the working and living conditions for the crew. One of the biggest jobs performed during the Vinson's yard stay was the installation of the Smart Carrier System, which makes use of automated technology to monitor the carrier's damage control, jet fuel and list control systems.

While the Vinson was conducting FRS Carrier Qualifications in southern Californian waters, in late September, the Navy ordered the ship to accelerate its Inter-Deployment Training Cycle (IDTC) to prepare themselves to become Pacific Fleet&rsquos "ready carrier."

November ?, The Carl Vinson departed homeport for a month-long Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) Returned home on Dec. 10.

January 13, 2003 USS Carl Vinson departed Bremerton to participate in a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX), off the coast of southern California, before commencing a surge western Pacific deployment.

February 4, The Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group was ordered to head west to act as a deterrent to North Korea following an increase in tensions between the U.S. and the DPRK. That will enable USS Kitty Hawk (CV 63), which normally operates in the 7th Fleet, to deploy to the Arabian Gulf to participate in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

February 18, An F/A-18C, assigned to the Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 147, crashed in the western Pacific, about 45 miles from the Vinson, at approximately 20.15. The pilot ejected safely.

February 25, The Carl Vinson moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a routine port call.

In early March the U.S. Navy announced that USS Carl Vinson would head North making a port of call at Busan and would later take part in RSOI/FE 2003. This port visit was the first time in four years that a carrier made a port visit to the Republic of Korea during the exercise.

April 17, USS Carl Vinson moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a four-day port call after participated in exercise Tandem Thrust 2003 Moored at Berth 12 in Fleet Activities Yokosuka, Japan, from May 15-17 Inport Apra Harbor again for upkeep from May 2?- June 1.

June 2?, CVN 70 moored at Changi Naval Base for a five-day liberty port visit to Singapore.

July 14, USS Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of Fremantle, Australia, for a three-day visit to Perth Inport Hong Kong from Aug. 6-11.

August 29, The Carl Vinson moored at Berth 1 in Busan Naval Base, ROK, for a three-day port visit. The "Gold Eagle" recently received orders to return to Bremerton by Sept. 19, ending its extended deployment some two months earlier than originally planned.

September 15, The Carl Vinson moored at Naval Air Station North Island for a one-day stop to offload the remaining Air Wing personnel and equipment.

September 19, USS Carl Vinson returned to Naval Station Bremerton after more than seven-month deployment.

In January 2004, the Vinson was underway for carrier qualifications and training with the CVW-9, off the coast of southern California.

May 14, Capt. Kevin M. Donegan relieved Capt. Richard B. Wren as commanding officer of the "Gold Eagle."

June 17, The aircraft from CVW-9 sank the ex-USCGC White Bush (WLM 542), about 200 miles of the coast of southern California. An S-3B from VAQ-138 fired a pair of HARMs, while a Seahawk from HS-8 launched an AGM-114 Hellfire air-to-ground missile and Hornets pummeled the former U.S. Navy district craft with 20 Mk-83 1,000 pound bombs.

June 26, Rear Adm. Bruce W. Clingan relieved Rear Adm. Evan M. Chanik as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 3 during a change-of-command ceremony on board the Vinson.

June 29, The Carl Vinson returned to homeport after underway CQ and routine training in the SOCAL Op. Area Completed a three-week Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) on Oct. 2.

January 13, 2005 USS Carl Vinson departed Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton to participate in a Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX), the ship’s final step before leaving on its around the world cruise. The carrier is scheduled to arrive in its new homeport of Norfolk, Va., upon completion of its deployment.

January 30, The Carl Vinson CSG-3 successfully completed its 12-day Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) Departed San Diego on Feb. 1.

February 21, CVN 70 moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a four-day port call Moored at Berth 3/4, Changi Naval Base in Singapore from March 5-9.

March 20, USS Carl Vinson relieved the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) on station in the Arabian Gulf.

May 2, Two U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18C Hornets, assigned to the "Death Rattlers" of Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 323, collided at approximately 10:10 p.m. local time about 30,000 feet over Iraq, while flying in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

May 3, In early morning hours, the search teams located the body of a Capt. Kelly C. Hinz from one of two missing aircraft The body of Maj. John C. Spahr is located on May 4.

June 1, Cmdr. Ian V. Vatet relieved Cmdr. William Nolan as CO of the "Screwbirds" of Sea Control Squadron (VAQ) 33, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony in the Arabian Gulf.

June 18, USS Carl Vinson recently moored at Quay 9 in Port of Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a liberty visit to Dubai.

June 30, USS Carl Vinson CSG concluded operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and maritime security operations (MSO) in the Arabian Gulf. Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 9 launched more than 6,500 sorties, totaling more than 20,000 flight hours, in support of OIF Transited the Suez Canal northbound on July 8.

July 19, Following a port visit to Rhodes, Greece, the Vinson transited the Strait of Gibraltar westbound Inport Lisbon, Portugal, from July 20-2?.

July 31, USS Carl Vinson moored at Pier 14 on Naval Station Norfolk following a six-month deployment.

November 11, CVN 70 moved "dead-stick" from Pier 14, Naval Station Norfolk to the Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipyard for a scheduled 36-month Refueling and Complex Overhaul (RCOH). During RCOH, the Vinson will have its nuclear fuel replenished and will be upgraded with the latest technology enabling the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier to serve for another 25 years.

October 6, 2006 Capt. Walter E. Carter Jr. relieved Capt. Kevin M. Donegan as CO of the USS Carl Vinson during a change-of-command ceremony held at Fort Monroe, Va.

November 10, Northrop Grumman Corporation completed a significant milestone today on the Carl Vinson with the installation of the ship's rudders. During refurbishment, the 50-ton rudders were inspected, cleaned, painted and re-installed on the ship.

January 7, 2007 The workers at Newport News Shipyard completed the installation of four new propellers on USS Carl Vinson. The propellers installed are approximately 21 feet in diameter and weigh approximately 65,000 pounds each. They are very similar in size, weight, and material to the propellers on previous ships of the Nimitz class, but the blades are shaped differently to reduce wear and erosion.

February 21, The last major section of the mast was installed on board the Carl Vinson, using the Northrop Grumman's massive 310-ton crane. Putting the last piece of the mast in place represents a final major construction milestone for topside work.

March 30, The U.S. Navy announced that USS Carl Vinson will conduct a homeport change, returning to the West Coast and will likely relocate to San Diego in early 2010.

May 9, The Carl Vinson undocked from Dry Dock #11 and moored at Pier 3 on Newport News Shipyard, after completing an 18-month dry dock period.

February 4, 2008 Crew members assigned to the "Gold Eagle" began moving shipboard equipment back on board, marking another milestone in the aircraft carrier's shipboard coordinated on-load and outfitting plan (SCOOP) at Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipyard.

August 18, The Vinson's Sailors enjoyed their first meal served aboard the aircraft carrier after more than three years, during a ceremonial grand opening event held in the ship&rsquos newly refurbished aft mess deck facility.

July 1, 2009 USS Carl Vinson returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a three-day underway for sea trials, off the coast of Virginia, completing a three-and-a-half year overhaul.

July 7, Capt. Bruce H. Lindsey relieved Capt. Walter E. Carter, Jr., as CO of the Carl Vinson during the change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship.

July 12, CVN 70 launched and recovered aircraft, from Air Test and Evaluation Squadron (VX) 23, for the first time in nearly four years. The carrier departed Norfolk on Friday for sea trials and flight deck certification.

July 28, USS Carl Vinson is currently underway for Carrier Qualifications (CQ) and will return in August to Newport News for a Post Shakedown Availability (PSA). The work will last several months and include modernization of the ship's control and piping systems, replacement of the trash incinerator unit and boat and aircraft crane repairs.

December 5, The Carl Vinson returned to Naval Station Norfolk after a two-day underway for sea trials Underway for flight deck certifications on Dec. 8.

January 12, 2010 USS Carl Vinson departed Norfolk for a homeport change to San Diego, California. The carrier will circumnavigate South America and participate in exercises with naval units from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador and Peru.

January 13, The Vinson was rerouted in anticipation of humanitarian relief efforts in Haiti after a magnitude-7.0 quake devastated the impoverished nation Tuesday afternoon, leveling thousands of structures and leaving an untold number trapped in the ruins Arrived off the coast of Port-au-Prince for Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Response (HA/DR) operations on Jan. 15.

February 1, U.S. Southern Command has released USS Carl Vinson, USS Higgins (DDG 76), USS Bunker Hill (CG 52) and USNS Henson (T-AGS 63) from their duties as part of the Haiti Task Force. Ninetieth helicopters embarked aboard the Vinson flew more than 2,200 sorties, delivering more than 166 tons of food, 89,000 gallons of water and 38,700 pounds of medical supplies to earthquake victims. 19 Navy, Coast Guard and Military Sealift Command (MSC) ships will continue to support Operation Unified Response.

February 5, Cmdr. Miguel Peko relieved Cmdr. C. Wesley Bannister as CO of the "Tigertails" of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 125, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

February 6, The Carl Vinson moored at Naval Station Mayport, Fla., for a scheduled port visit.

February 26, USS Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, for a scheduled port call as part of Southern Seas 2010, a major component of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command Partnership of the Americas.

March 7, USS Carl Vinson, along with the USS Bunker Hill, conducted various naval exercises with the Uruguayan navy, including maneuvering drills and military-to-military exchanges, off the coast of the South American nation Participated in exercise "GRINGO-GAUCHO," off the coast of Argentina, from March 8-10.

March 13, CVN 70 anchored off the coast of Punta Arenas, Chile, for an overnight stop and to take on supplies Transited the Strait of Magellan on March 14 Participated in various exercises with the Chilean navy from March 15-23.

March 29, The "Gold Eagle" anchored off the coast of Callao, Peru, for a scheduled port visit after conducting joint operations with the Peruvian naval and air forces, as part of Southern Seas.

April 12, USS Carl Vinson arrived in its new homeport of Naval Air Station North Island in San Diego after a three-month deployment in support of Operation Unified Response and Southern Seas 2010.

July 1, Vice Adm. Allen G. Myers, IV relieved Vice Adm. Thomas J. Kilcline, Jr., as Commander, Naval Air Forces during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Vinson.

July 13, A milestone is reached when an EA-18G "Growler" from VAQ-129, flown by Lt. Ian C. Hudson and Lt. Ben Hartman, recorded the 200,000th aircraft landing on board the USS Carl Vinson. CVN 70 is currently conducting Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ), off the coast of southern California, after recently completed a 10-week maintenance availability.

July 24, USS Carl Vinson reached a historic milestone following the successful launch of 11 Evolved Sea Sparrow Missiles (ESSM) and one Rolling Airframe Missiles (RAM), within a seven-day period, while underway for Combat System's Ship Qualification Trials (CSSQT).

July 28, The Vinson completed the onload of more than 1,000 tons of ammunition in two days, from USNS Shasta (T-AE 33), preparing the ship for upcoming work-up cycles Returned home on July 30.

August 3, USS Carl Vinson is currently underway for Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) off the coast of southern California.

August 16, Capt. Stephen McInerney relieved Capt. Andrew Whitson as CO of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while the Vinson was underway for carrier qualifications.

September 1, CVN 70 participated in a tactical manuevering exercises with the ships from Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1, along with USS McClusky (FFG 41) and USS Rentz (FFG 46) off the coast of southern California Returned to Naval Air Station North Island on Sept. 3.

October 6, The "Gold Eagle" is currently underway for INSURV preparations in the SOCAL Op. Area Underway for Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV) assessment from Oct. 18-20.

November 30, USS Carl Vinson departed San Diego for a surge deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet Areas of Responsibility. The Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1 will first conduct Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX), off the coast of southern California, before heading west.

January 11, 2011 The Carl Vinson moored at Busan Naval Base, Republic of Korea, for a three-day port visit.

From January 19-20, the Carl Vinson CSG and the Republic of Singapore Navy (RSN) participated in an Air Surface Warfare exercise in the South China Sea.

January 22, USS Carl Vinson moored at Glen Cruise Terminal in Port Klang, Malaysia, for a liberty port visit to Kuala Lumpur.

February 4, An HH-60H Sea Hawk, assigned to "Red Lions" of the Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron (HS) 15, successfully recovered uninjured Sailor in less than 20 minutes, who went overboard the Vinson at approximately 2:15 p.m. local time, while the carrier was underway in the Arabian Sea.

February 8, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

March 26, USS Carl Vinson recently departed Port of Jebel Ali, U.A.E., after a liberty visit to Dubai.

April 11, An F/A-18C Hornet, assigned to the "Stingers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 113, made an arrested landing using one engine before became engulfed in flame. No one was injured.

May 15, The "Gold Eagle" anchored off the coast of Manila, Republic of the Philippines, for a three-day port visit.

May 22, USS Carl Vinson anchored in Victoria Harbour for a four-day port visit to Hong Kong.

June 7, CVN 70 pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a three-day port call and to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise.

June 15, USS Carl Vinson returned to Naval Air Station North Island after a six-and-a-half month deployment. The aircraft from CVW-17 flew 1656 missions into Afghanistan and Iraq and logged 9,140 flight hours.

September 9, The Nimitz-class aircraft carrier returned to homeport after a three-day underway off the coast of southern California Underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron Carrier Qualifications (FRS-CQ) from Sept. 12-1? Underway for Carrier Strike Group Sustainment Exercise (SUSTEX) on Sept. 16.

October 8, USS Carl Vinson arrived in San Francisco, Calif., for a scheduled port visit to participate in the annual Fleet Week festivities.

November 11, Michigan State University and the University of North Carolina held an inaugural Quicken Loans Carrier Classic basketball game on the flight deck of CVN 70. The Carrier Classic is a celebration of Veterans Day.

November 18, Rear Adm. Thomas K. Shannon relieved Rear Adm. Samuel Perez as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Vinson.

November 30, USS Carl Vinson departed San Diego for a scheduled deployment.

December 2, Capt. Kent D. Whalen relieved Capt. Bruce H. Lindsey as CO of the Vinson during a change-of-command ceremony in the ship&rsquos hangar bay.

December 8, Rear Adm. Thomas K. Shannon, Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1 fired the CO of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 134, Cmdr. Jonathan L. Jackson, due to a "loss of confidence in his ability to command," following an investigation into sexual harassment allegations. Cmdr. Gregory D. Byers assumed temporary command of the "Garudas."

December 27, USS Carl Vinson anchored in Victoria Harbour for a three-day liberty port visit to Hong Kong.

January 14, 2012 Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan.

January ?, Cmdr. Richard "Gash" Rivera relieved Cmdr. John "Booner" Boone as CO of the "Sunliners" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 81, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

January 19, An F/A-18F, assigned to "Fighting Redcocks" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 22, and two F/A-18Es from VFA-81 recently landed at Sakhir Airbase to participate in the second Bahrain International Airshow (BIAS), from Jan. 19-21.

February 17, Hull Technician 1st Class Paris S. Pough, assigned to the Vinson, died as a result of a non-combat related incident during a port visit to Dubai.

February 21, USS Carl Vinson departed Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, after a four-day liberty port call Inport Jebel Ali again from March 26-29.

April 3, USS Carl Vinson CSG departed the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of Responsibility (AoR). Aircraft from CVW-17 flew 1,085 missions in support of OEF, totaling 6,600 flight hours and delivered 7,293 pounds of ordnance.

April 7, CVN 70 anchored off the coast of Chennai, India, for a three-day port visit.

From April 10-16, the Carl Vinson CSG, along with the USS Tucson (SSN 770) and USNS Bridge (T-AOE 10), participated in exercise Malabar 2012 in the Bay of Bengal, with the INS Satpura (F48), INS Ranvir (D54), INS Ranvijay (D55), INS Kulish (P63) and INS Shakti (A57).

April 24, USS Carl Vinson anchored off the coast of Fremantle, Australia, for a five-day visit to Perth that coincides with the Anzac Day celebration.

May 1, Cmdr. Fernando Garcia, CO of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 22, achieved his 1,000th carrier-arrested landing while flying an F/A-18F Super Hornet.

May 15, USS Carl Vinson CSG pulled into Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a routine port call to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise. The CSG-1 became the first U.S. Navy Carrier Strike Group to participate in the Oceania Maritime Security Initiative (OMSI), a maritime law enforcement operation within the Oceania's exclusive economic zone, from May 7-15.

May 23, The Carl Vinson returned to San Diego after a six-month deployment in the U.S. 5th and 7th Fleet AoR.

June 29, The Vinson departed Naval Air Station North Island for a Friends and Family Day Cruise.

August 1, CVN 70 commenced a six-month Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) while moored at Juliet Pier on NAS North Island.

February 1, 2013 USS Carl Vinson departed homeport for a three-day underway to conduct sea trials.

February 11, The Carl Vinson departed NAS North Island for an eight-day underway to conduct flight deck certifications, Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the CVW-17, testing with the MV-22 Osprey aircraft from Marine Medium Tiltrotor Squadron (VMM) 166 and ammo onload with the USNS Richard E. Byrd (T-AKE 4).

February 21, Rear Adm. David F. Steindl relieved Rear Adm. Thomas K. Shannon as Commander, Carrier Strike Group One (CSG) 1 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the "Gold Eagle.".

February 25, USS Carl Vinson departed homeport for a five-day underway to conduct Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) CQ Underway for routine training from April 16-18 and April 22-26 Underway for CQ with the CVW-17 from May 2-14 Underway for Mid-Cycle Material Assessment (MCMA) from May 20-21 Underway for routine training from June 4-12 and June 25- July 1 Underway for FRS/TRACOM CQ from Sept. 10-21 Underway for local operations from Nov. 18-22 Underway for FRS/CVW-9 CQ from Dec. 3-9.

January 16, 2014 USS Carl Vinson departed Naval Air Station North Island for a 25-day underway to conduct Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Problem (FEP), with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17.

January 28, Rear Adm. Christopher W. Grady relieved Rear Adm. David F. Steindl as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the CVN 70, while underway off the coast of southern California.

April 1, The Carl Vinson departed homeport for a nine-day underway to conduct FRS/TRACOM Carrier Qualifications (CQ) in the SOCAL Op. Area.

June 4, An F/A-18E Super Hornet, assigned to the "Sunliners" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 81, crashed at sea around 10 p.m., after attempting to land on board the USS Carl Vinson, while the carrier was underway off the coast of southern California. The pilot ejected safely.

From June 10-11, the Carl Vinson conducted ammunition onload with the USNS Carl Brashear (T-AKE 7).

June 13, USS Carl Vinson returned to homeport after a five-week underway for Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX).

August 22, USS Carl Vinson departed San Diego for a scheduled Middle East deployment.

August 24, Cmdr. Brian T. Schrum relieved Cmdr. Todd C. Hubber as CO of the "Stingers" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 113, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

September 1, Capt. Karl O. Tomas relieved Capt. Kent D. Whalen as the 14th CO of CVN 70 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the ship, while underway off the coast of Hawaii.

September 3, The Carrier Strike Group One (CSG) 1 completed a four-day Undersea Warfare Exercise (USWEX) USS Carl Vinson and CVW-17 conducted strike training and missile exercise, at the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) Barking Sands Op. Area, from Sept. 3-5.

September 12, Two F/A-18C Hornets, assigned to VFA-94 and VFA-113, crashed approximately 250 n.m. west of Wake Island, at 5.40 p.m. local time, after a mid-air collision seven miles from the ship, just after being launched from the carrier. The "Stingers" pilot was safely returned back aboard the USS Carl Vinson. Lt. Nathan T. Poloski was lost at sea.

From September 16-23, USS Carl Vinson CSG participated in a biennial field training exercise (FTX) Valiant Shield 2014, off the coast of Guam and Saipan Transited the Surigao Strait on Sept. 27.

October 2, The Carl Vinson moored at Berth 3/4, Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a five-day port visit.

October 17, USS Carl Vinson CSG entered the Arabian Gulf after transiting Strait of Hormuz Conducted turnover with the USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) CSG on Oct. 18.

October 19, Aircraft from Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 launched its first combat sorties in support of Operation Inherent Resolve, against the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) militants in Iraq and Syria.

November 14, USS Carl Vinson moored at Quay 9 in Port of Jebel Ali, United Arab Emirates, for a four-day liberty visit to Dubai Inport Jebel Ali again from Dec. 23-27.

January 27, 2015 CVN 70 moored at Berth 5, Khalifa Bin Salman Port (KBSP) in Hidd, Bahrain, for a five-day liberty visit to Manama.

February 21, USS Carl Vinson moored at Container Terminal in Mina Zayed Port, U.A.E., for a five-day visit to Abu Dhabi, in conjunction with the 12th International Defense Exhibition and Conference (IDEX) 2015, the first for United States nuclear-powered aircraft carrier.

April 2, The Carl Vinson pulled again into Jebel Ali, U.A.E., for a four-day port call Departed Arabian Gulf on April 12.

April 13, USS Carl Vinson CSG conducted turnover with the USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) CSG while underway in the Gulf of Oman. While on station in the Arabian Gulf, the Vinson launched 2,383 combat sorties and expended mored than 500,000 pounds of ordnance in support of Operation Inherent Resolve.

April 26, The Carl Vinson anchored at Gage Roads Anchorage C off Fremantle, Australia, for a six-day liberty visit to Perth in conjunction with the Anzac Day celebration.

May 3, Cmdr. Lewis W. Callaway relieved Cmdr. William Fraser as CO of the "Stingers" of Electronic Attack Squadron (VAQ) 139, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

May 6, The Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Goup (CSG) transited the Lombok Strait northbound.

May 10, USS Carl Vinson, USS Bunker Hill (CG 52) and USS Gridley (DDG 101) participated in a Passing Exercise (PASSEX), with the Malaysian frigate KD Lekir (FSG 26), while transiting the South China Sea Transited the Sibutu Passage southbound on May 13 Entered the Philippine Sea on May 15.

May 26, Cmdr. Robert D. Quinn, III relieved Cmdr. Mark J. Callari as CO of the "Fighting Redcocks" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 22, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

May 27, The Vinson moored at Berth H3/H4 in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, for a three-day port visit and to embark friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise.

May 31, An MH-60S Seahawk, assigned to the Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 15, rescued a mariner, more than 400 nautical miles off the coast of Honolulu, who had been alone at sea for more than 30 days aboard his 35-foot sailboat.

June 4, USS Carl Vinson moored at Berth L, Carrier Wharf on NAS North Island following a nine-and-a-half month combat deployment.

July 8, The Carl Vinson departed homeport to conduct ordnance offload with the USNS Cesar Chavez (T-AKE 14) Moored at Carrier Wharf on July 9 Moored at Juliet Pier after underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on July 11.

July 17, Rear Adm. James T. Loeblein relieved Rear Adm. Christopher W. Grady as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the USS Carl Vinson.

August 14, USS Carl Vinson commenced a six-month, more than $300 million worth, Planned Incremental Availability (PIA) while moored at Pier J, NAS North Island.

April 30, 2016 The Carl Vinson moored at Berth L, Carrier Wharf after a two-day underway for sea trials Underway for flight deck certification and Carrier Qualifications (CQ) with the CVW-11 on May 3 Conducted ammo onload with the USNS Washington Chambers (T-AKE 11) from May 14-16 Returned home on May 19.

May 31, Capt. Douglas C. Verissimo relieved Capt. Karl O. Tomas as CO of the USS Carl Vinson during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship at Berth Lima.

June 3, CVN 70 departed NAS North Island for a 12-day underway to conduct Command Assessment of Readiness and Training (CART) II, FRS/CVW-17 CQ, testing with an MV-22B Osprey aircraft, assigned to Marine Operational Test and Evaluation Squadron (VMX) 1, and INSURV preparations Underway again on July 8.

July 22, USS Carl Vinson commenced a 13-day Fleet Battle Experiment with three MV-22B Osprey from VMX-1 and one V-22, assigned to the Marine Helicopter Squadron (HMX) 1. The Navy&rsquos version of the Marine Corps&rsquo newest rotary-wing aircraft would be designated CMV-22B and is slated to replace the C-2A Greyhound as the carrier onboard delivery (COD) platform.

August 1, Capt. Nick A. Sarap, Jr., relieved Capt. Joseph M. Keenan as Commander, Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 1 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the Vinson, while underway off the coast of southern California.

August 8, Rear Adm. James W. Kilby relieved Rear Adm. James T. Loeblein as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1 during a change-of-command ceremony aboard the CVN 70.

August 11, USS Carl Vinson moored at Berth L, NAS North Island after a 34-day underway for Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Period (FEP), with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 Underway for INSURV rehearsal from Aug. 16-17 Underway for INSURV assessment from Aug. 30-31 Underway for FRS-CQ from Sept. 8-14.

November 21, The Carl Vinson moored at Berth Lima after a 28-day underway, off the coast of southern California, for Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) and Joint Task Force Exercise (JTFEX) Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on Dec. 29.

January 5, 2017 USS Carl Vinson departed San Diego for a scheduled western Pacific deployment.

From January 14-18, the Carl Vinson CSG participated in an Undersea Warfare Exercise (USWEX) 17-1, while underway off the coast of Oahu, Hawaii.

January 28, CVN 70 conducted ammunition onload with the USNS Charles Drew (T-AKE 10), while underway in the Guam Op. Area.

February 9, Cmdr. Aaron P. Rybar relieved Cmdr. Benjamin P. Duelley as CO of the "Black Eagles" of Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 113, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

February 10, USS Carl Vinson moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a four-day liberty port visit Transited the Luzon Strait westbound on Feb. 18.

March 6, Cmdr. Alexander P. Solomon relieved Cmdr. Derek D. Duford as CO of the "Blue Blasters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 34, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony, while underway in the South China Sea.

March 6, USS Carl Vinson, along with the USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108), transited the Luzon Strait eastbound Participated in joint naval drills with the JS Samidare (DD 106) and JS Sazanami (DD 113), in the East China Sea, from March 7-10 Transited the Korean Strait northbound on March 11.

March 15, USS Carl Vinson moored at Berth 1, Busan Naval Base for a five-day port visit to the Republic of Korea in support of command post exercise Key Resolve.

March 22, The Carl Vinson CSG, along with the USS Stethem (DDG 63) and USS Alexandria (SSN 757), participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX) with the ROK Navy ships, while underway in the Sea of Japan, as part of an annual joint exercise Foal Eagle.

From March 26-29, USS Carl Vinson, along with the USS Lake Champlain (CG 57) and USS Wayne E. Meyer, participated in joint naval drills with the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) ships, while underway in the East China Sea Entered the South China Sea again on March 30.

April 4, The Carl Vinson moored at Berth 3/4, Changi Naval Base in Singapore for a four-day liberty port visit Transited the Sunda Strait southbound on April 15 Transited the Lombok Strait northbound on April 19.?

April 21, A F/A-18E Super Hornet (Bureau #165904), assigned to the "Kestrels" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 137, crashed at sea during the final approach to USS Carl Vinson, while the aircraft carrier was underway in the Celebes Sea. Capt. Gregory D. Newkirk, deputy commander of CVW-2, ejected safely and was quickly recovered.

From April 23-26, USS Carl Vinson, along with the USS Lake Champlain and USS Michael Murphy (DDG 112), paticipated in joint naval drills with the JS Samidare and JS Ashigara (DDG 178), while transiting the Philippine Sea northbound.

April 29, USS Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1 transited the Korean Strait northbound Paticipated in joint naval drills with the USS Stethem (DDG 63), ROKS Sejong the Great (DDG 991) and ROKS Yang Manchun (DDH 973), from April 29- May 3.

June 1, The Carl Vinson CSG, along with the USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) CSG, JS Hyuga (DDH 181) and JS Ashigara (DDG 178), participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX), while underway in the Sea of Japan as a "show of force" Transited the Korean Strait southbound on June 3.

June 14, CVN 70 moored at Pier H3/H4 on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, for a three-day port visit and to embark "Tigers."

June 23, USS Carl Vinson moored at Berth Lima, Naval Air Station North Island following a five-and-a-half month deployment.

August 7, The Carl Vinson moored at Juliet Pier, NAS North Island after a week-long underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) Carrier Qualifications (CQ) Underway for FRS-CQ again, following a two-month Continuous Maintenance Availability (CMAV), on Oct. 18.

October 18, A F-35C Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) aircraft (Bureau #169303), assigned to the "Rough Riders" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 125, landed for the first time aboard the Carl Vinson.

October 21, USS Carl Vinson moored at Berth L, Naval Air Station North Island Underway for a Sustainment Exercise (SUSTEX) from Oct. 27- Nov. 17.

January 5, 2018 USS Carl Vinson departed San Diego for a scheduled western Pacific deployment.

January 15, Cmdr. Eddie J. Park relieved Cmdr. Timothy C. Boehme as CO of the "Blue Hawks" of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 78, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

January 18, Capt. Thomas D. Barber, Commander, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 and Cmdr. Jason D. Hutcherson, the CO of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 2, completed their 1,000th arrested landing aboard the aircraft carrier with the trap of an F/A-18F Super Hornet, assigned to the "Bounty Hunters."

January 20, USS Carl Vinson participated in a passing exercise (PASSEX), with the USS America (LHA 6), while underway in the Hawaiian Op. Area.

January 31, The Carl Vinson moored at Kilo Wharf in Apra Harbor, Guam, for a three-day port visit Transited the Surigao Strait southbound on Feb. 7 Transited the Balabac Strait westbound on Feb. 8.

February 16, USS Carl Vinson anchored 5 n.m. off the coast of Manila, Republic of the Philippines, for a four-day port visit.

March 5, The Carl Vinson anchored 2 miles northwest of Tien Sa Port in Da Nang, Vietnam, for a four-day visit, the first for U.S. aircraft carrier since the attack on USNS Card (T-AKV 40), the ex-escort carrier CVE 11, in Port of Saigon on May 2, 1964.

March 11, USS Carl Vinson, along with the USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108), commenced a bilateral exercise with the JS Ise (DDH 182), while underway in the South China Sea Transited the Luzon Strait eastbound on March 14.?

March 21, The Carl Vinson conducted a replenishment-at-sea, with the USNS Cesar Chavez (T-AKE 14), while underway east of Okinawa, Japan Conducted ammo offload from March 24-2? Conducted a replenishment-at-sea with the USNS Rappahannock (T-AO 204), off the coast of Guam, on March 28 Transited 3 miles south of Oahu, Hawaii, en route to San Diego, on April 5.

April 10, The U.S. Navy's legacy F/A-18C Hornet, assigned to the "Blue Blasters" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 34, concluded the last operational deployment aboard the aircraft carrier.

April 12, USS Carl Vinson moored at Berth L on Naval Air Station North Island following a three-month deployment.

May 17, The Carl Vinson returned to homeport after a three-day underway for Fleet Replacement Squadron (FRS) Carrier Qualifications (CQ) Underway for a Friends and Family Day Cruise on May 19.

June 11, Capt. Matthew C. Paradise relieved Capt. Douglas C. Verissimo as the 16th CO of Carl Vinson during a change-of-command ceremony on board the ship.

June 12, Rear Adm. Alvin Holsey relieved Rear Adm. John V. Fuller as Commander, Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1 during a change-of-command ceremony on board the Vinson.

June 18, USS Carl Vinson departed San Diego to participate in a biennial multinational exercise Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2018.

June 20, Cmdr. Ryan C. Hayes relieved Cmdr. Sean Knight as CO of the "Black Knights" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 4, during an aerial change-of-command ceremony.

June 26, The Carl Vinson moored at Pier H3/H4 on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, for the in-port phase of RIMPAC Underway for at-sea phase on July 9 Participated in a photo exercise (PHOTOEX), northwest of Kauai, on July 26.

July 27, Two MH-60S Seahawks, assigned to the "Black Knights" of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 4, rescued five mariners in distress, on Friday morning, after their 36-foot vessel ran aground in shallow water near the island of Niihau.

July 31, USS Carl Vinson moored again at Pier H3/H4 on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam for a three-day port call.

August 8, The Carl Vinson moored at Berth L on Naval Air Station North Island Underway again from Sept. 23-29 Underway for Sustainment Exercise (SUSTEX) on Oct. 8.

October 31, The Carl Vinson recently participated in Undersea Warfare Exercise (USWEX) 18, with the USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) CSG, in the Hawaiian Op. Area Returned home on Nov. 5 Underway for FRS/CVW-11 CQ from Dec. 7-12.

January 20, 2019 USS Carl Vinson moored at Delta Pier in its new administrative homeport of Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton, Wash., after a four-day transit from San Diego.

February 8, General Dynamics NASSCO-Bremerton was awarded a $34,3 million modification to previously awarded contract (N00024-14-C-4321) for the USS Carl Vinson's Drydocking Planned Incremental Availability (DPIA). Work is expected to be completed by July 2020.

February 28, USS Carl Vinson entered the Dry Dock #6 at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF).

April 6, 2020 The Carl Vinson undocked and moored at Bravo Pier on Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton Underway for sea trials on Aug. 23.

September 2, USS Carl Vinson moored at Kilo Pier on Naval Air Station North Island following a 19-month maintenance availability Underway for flight deck certification and CQ with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 from Sept. 11-18 Underway for FRS-CQ on Nov. 16.

November 20, An CMV-22B Osprey, assigned to the "Titans" of Fleet Logistics Multi-Mission Squadron (VRM) 30, landed on board the CVN 70 for the first time.

November 22, USS Carl Vinson moored at Kilo Pier on Naval Air Station North Island Underway again on Dec. 3 Moored at Berth Lima on Dec. 9 Underway for FRS-CQ from Jan. 18-23.

January 24, 2021 Capt. P. Scott Miller relieved Capt. Matthew C. Paradise as CO of the Carl Vinson during a brief ceremony aboard the ship.

January 27, USS Carl Vinson departed Naval Air Station North Island for a Tailored Ship's Training Availability (TSTA) and Final Evaluation Period (FEP), with the Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 2 Moored at Berth L, for COVID-19 immunization, from Feb. 18-20 Returned home on Feb. 27 Underway again from March 5-7, April 5-7, April 12-13, April 26- May 1 and May 17-22.

June 7, The Carl Vinson departed homeport for a Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) Arrived in the Hawaiian Op. Area, in support of emergent national tasking, on June 16.


Sessions at a glance

For a full line-up, including session times, please register for Think and visit the event platform.

1043 Training and staffing tips for your cloud transformation project

Cloud skills are an issue for most cloud projects. How are other experts managing their cloud skill gaps? When should you invest in training versus consulting? Join us for a panel discussion moderated by Aki Duvvur, VP IBM Public Cloud and joined by Thibault Dauphin, Cloud Education Lead for BNP Paribas Mark Wyllie, CEO of Flagship Solutions Group and Joe Noonan, Client Technical Leader, IBM.

1061 Unleashing Industry 4.0 innovation on hybrid cloud with 5G, AI and Edge

Manufacturers around the globe are encountering unprecedented challenges brought about by technological disruption and the COVID-19 pandemic. Deep integration of cutting-edge technologies with the changing nature of work will be key to turning these challenges into opportunities for growth. This session will explore how the intersection of 5G, AI, cloud, IoT and Robotics at the Edge can create a unique platform for Industry 4.0 transformation, worker empowerment and business innovation.

1088 Maturing threat management with security as a service

In this session, Dr. Matti Mantere, CISO of Luminor Group, the third largest provider of financial services in the Baltics, shares lessons learned on the group’s cyber risk management maturity journey. He talks about initiatives the group took to improve its internal capabilities, and why it chose to move to a security-as-a-service model to progress on its journey. He also shares his insights on the benefits and challenges to consider for successful threat management.

1118 OpenBuilt: Enabling collaboration across a fragmented supply chain

The fragmented built environment industry (construction, engineering, operations, manufacturing, infrastructure) has long been challenged by project delays, cost overages and material waste, caused by lack of coordination across multiple parties. An ecosystem, including Cemex, EDIN Network, AS Backe, Sol Services, Element, coBuilder, IBM and Red Hat, has come together to co-develop OpenBuilt. This session will discuss new possibilities for the built environment industry.

1120 Building real-time inventory solutions leveraging multiple styles of integration with Prolifics

In today's environment there is little patience for application outages from spikes in demand and no room for the additional costs to handle the scale-up or -down requirements manually. Learn how IBM Cloud Pak for Integration’s latest messaging and events capabilities deliver uniform clustering and native high availability (HA), which reduces outage risk and costs. You will also hear examples from our partner Prolifics, who will share a real-time inventory solution built on Kafka and IBM MQ.

1127 Modernize with containers: Migrating legacy applications

On the journey to the cloud, enterprise developers are facing challenges moving their existing on-premises applications to the cloud quickly and cost-effectively. One of the best solutions to this challenge is to modernize the platform infrastructure of an existing application and update its internal architecture and features. In this session by IBM Developer and Infosys, we will discuss what Application Modernization looks like in the real world and how we can run an app on the cloud.


Crude futures declined in late-September 2015 when it became clear that oil stockpiles were growing amid increased production. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported on September 30, 2015, that U.S. commercial crude oil inventories rose by 4.5 million barrels from the previous week. At almost 500 million barrels, U.S. crude oil inventories were at their highest level in at least the last 80 years.

Total oil production by the end of 2015 was expected to increase to more than 9.35 million barrels per day—higher than previous forecasts of 9.3 million barrels per day.


Czech city remembers expelled ethnic Germans

Hundreds of Czechs have taken part in a march to remember the deaths of 1,700 ethnic Germans 70 years ago. Some 20,000 Germans were expelled from the city of Brno at the end of World War II.

The commemorative 20-mile (32-kilometer) walk began on Saturday from the site of a mass grave in the town of Pohorelice and ended in Brno. Called the "Pilgrimage of Reconciliation," it is the first official event to remember the so called Brno Death March, which started on May 30, 1945.

In 1945, when Germany ended its occupation of then Czechoslovakia, Brno authorities forced over 20,000 ethnic Germans out of the country on foot to Austria, an act widely seen as an act of revenge to Nazi atrocities. Around 3 million ethnic Germans had lived in the country for centuries but were considered as enemies by Czechoslovakia after the war.

"According to witnesses, many were dying on the way of exhaustion, some succumbed to epidemics that spread in the Pohorelice camp, some were beaten to death or shot by the armed guards," Brno's government said in a declaration, which was approved earlier in May. For the first time, the city authorities officially expressed regret about the Germans' expulsion and deaths.

"It is good to talk about what happened to prevent it from happening in the future," said Matej Hollan, Brno's deputy mayor.

The city council has declared 2015 a year of reconciliation and said it planned to face up to its history. It expressed regrets to the survivors and the descendants of those died in 1945.

"It is a unique opportunity to show that Brno is not closing its eyes on its own history," said the city's mayor, Petr Vokral.

At the end of the Brno Death March reenactment, representatives from Brno and Austria will speak to march participants at Augustinian Abbey in Old Brno.

The city government's reconciliation efforts have received criticism from some quarters. A branch of an organization that fought the Nazis during World War II said the march paled in comparison to the injustices suffered under Nazi occupation.

"We see no reason to apologize to the Brno Germans who imposed such injustice and suffering on the Czech people," the group said in a statement.


Exams scheduled to retire

Exams scheduled to be retired in the next 12 months are listed here by date. (This information is subject to change.)

Retiring on June 30, 2021
AI-100: Designing and Implementing an Azure AI Solution
DP-200: Implementing an Azure Data Solution
DP-201: Designing an Azure Data Solution
MB-600: Microsoft Dynamics 365 + Power Platform Solution Architect
MB-901: Microsoft Dynamics 365 Fundamentals
Retiring on June 30, 2022
98-349: Windows Operating System Fundamentals
98-361: Software Development Fundamentals
98-364: Database Fundamentals
98-365: Windows Server Administration Fundamentals
98-366: Networking Fundamentals
98-367: Security Fundamentals
98-368: Mobility and Devices Fundamentals
98-375: HTML5 Application Development Fundamentals
98-381: Introduction to Programming Using Python
98-382: Introduction to Programming Using JavaScript
98-383: Introduction to Programming Using HTML and CSS
98-388: Introduction to Programming Using Java


Americans’ Internet Access:2000-2015

Main Findings

The Pew Research Center’s unit studying the internet and society began systematically measuring internet adoption among Americans in 2000. Since then, Pew Research has conducted 97 national surveys of adults that have documented how the internet has become an integral part of everyday life across diverse parts of society.

84% of American Adults Use the Internet

Year Percent
2000 52%
2001 55%
2002 59%
2003 61%
2004 63%
2005 68%
2006 71%
2007 74%
2008 74%
2009 76%
2010 76%
2011 79%
2012 83%
2013 84%
2014 84%
2015 84%

Source: Pew Research Center surveys, 2000-2015.

A new analysis of 15 years-worth of data highlights several key trends: For some groups, especially young adults, those with high levels of education, and those in more affluent households, internet penetration is at full saturation levels. For other groups, such as older adults, those with less educational attainment, and those living in lower-income households, adoption has historically been lower but rising steadily, especially in recent years. At the same time, digital gaps still persist.

In this report, we cover some of the major demographic trends that lie beneath the topline adoption numbers and highlight:

  • Age differences: Older adults have lagged behind younger adults in their adoption, but now a clear majority (58%) of senior citizens uses the internet.
  • Class differences: Those with college educations are more likely than those who do not have high school diplomas to use the internet. Similarly, those who live in households earning more than $75,000 are more likely to be internet users than those living in households earning less than $30,000. Still, the class-related gaps have shrunk dramatically in 15 years as the most pronounced growth has come among those in lower-income households and those with lower levels of educational attainment.
  • Racial and ethnic differences: African-Americans and Hispanics have been somewhat less likely than whites or English-speaking Asian-Americans to be internet users, but the gaps have narrowed. Today, 78% of blacks and 81% of Hispanics use the internet, compared with 85% of whites and 97% of English-speaking Asian Americans.
  • Community differences: Those who live in rural areas are less likely than those in the suburbs and urban areas to use the internet. Still, 78% of rural residents are online.

The full story is told in the charts below:

Internet Usage by Age

The proportion of young adults ages 18-29 who use the internet has always outpaced overall adoption levels among older groups. But while older adults still report lower levels of internet use today, seniors have the greatest rate of change since 2000.

Young Adults Are Most Likely to Use The Internet, but Seniors Show Faster Adoption Rates

Year 18-29 30-49 50-64 65 or older
2000 70% 61% 46% 14%
2001 72% 65% 50% 14%
2002 76% 70% 54% 18%
2003 78% 72% 56% 22%
2004 77% 75% 61% 24%
2005 83% 79% 66% 28%
2006 86% 82% 70% 32%
2007 89% 85% 71% 35%
2008 89% 84% 72% 38%
2009 92% 84% 75% 40%
2010 92% 85% 74% 43%
2011 94% 87% 77% 46%
2012 96% 91% 79% 54%
2013 97% 92% 81% 56%
2014 97% 92% 81% 57%
2015 96% 93% 81% 58%

Source: Pew Research Center surveys, 2000-2015.

In 2000, 70% of young adults used the internet and that figure has steadily grown to 96% today. At the other end of the spectrum, 14% of seniors used the internet in 2000, while 58% do so today. Not until 2012 did more than half of all adults ages 65 and older report using the internet.

Internet Usage by Education Attainment

Since the Pew Research Center began consistently measuring internet penetration, educational attainment has been one of the strongest indicators of use. While a large majority of the well-educated has consistently been online, those without a college degree saw greater rates of adoption over the past 15 years and have notably lowered the access gap.

While Less-Educated Adults Are Catching Up, Their Internet Adoption Rates Are Still Below Those of College Graduates

Year College+ Some college HS grad Less than HS
2000 78% 67% 40% 19%
2001 81% 68% 43% 21%
2002 83% 73% 48% 24%
2003 85% 75% 51% 25%
2004 86% 76% 53% 27%
2005 89% 80% 58% 32%
2006 91% 83% 61% 37%
2007 92% 85% 65% 40%
2008 93% 86% 65% 38%
2009 94% 87% 68% 40%
2010 93% 87% 68% 41%
2011 94% 89% 72% 50%
2012 96% 91% 75% 55%
2013 96% 92% 76% 60%
2014 96% 91% 76% 55%
2015 95% 90% 76% 66%

Pew Research Center Surveys, 2000-2015.

Adults with a college or graduate degree are the most likely to use the internet, with almost all of these adults (95%) saying they are internet users. This proportion has always been high – fifteen years ago, 78% of adults with at least a college degree used the internet. But the situation in 2000 was much different for those with less education: in that year, only 19% of those without a high school diploma reported that they were internet users. For those who have not completed high school, 66% now use the internet, still below where college graduates were in 2000.

Internet Usage by Household Income

Another marker of class differences – household income – is also a strong indicator of internet usage. Adults living in households with an annual income of at least $75,000 a year are the most likely to use the internet, with 97% of adults in this group currently reporting they are internet users. Those living in households with an annual income under $30,000 a year are less likely to report internet usage, with 74% of adults doing so now.

Those In Higher-Income Households Are Most Likely To Use Internet

Year $75K+ $50K-$74,999 $30K-$49,999 Less than $30K
2000 81% 72% 58% 34%
2001 84% 75% 60% 36%
2002 85% 76% 64% 39%
2003 87% 81% 66% 41%
2004 88% 83% 68% 44%
2005 92% 86% 73% 49%
2006 92% 86% 75% 52%
2007 93% 86% 74% 58%
2008 95% 88% 78% 54%
2009 95% 92% 79% 60%
2010 95% 88% 81% 61%
2011 97% 90% 85% 64%
2012 97% 93% 87% 71%
2013 97% 93% 86% 72%
2014 96% 93% 86% 74%
2015 97% 95% 85% 74%

Source: Pew Research Center surveys, 2000-2015.

These trends have been consistent over time, although the more recent rise of smartphones has provided internet access to lower-income people, sometimes with lower prices, sometimes with other attractive technology features. Indeed, a recent report released by Pew Research found that lower-income Americans are increasingly “smartphone-dependent” for internet access.

Internet Usage by Race/Ethnicity

Since 2000, English-speaking Asian-Americans have shown consistently higher rates of internet usage compared to whites, blacks, and Hispanics. Fully 72% of English-speaking Asian-Americans said they were internet users 15 years ago when Pew Research began to regularly measure internet access. Whites and Hispanics would not cross this threshold until 2006, and blacks would reach this level in 2011. In 2014, fully 97% of English-speaking Asian-Americans reported being internet users.

Among different racial and ethnic groups, African-Americans have seen the greatest growth rate between 2000 and today, though they are still less likely than whites and English-speaking Asian-Americans to be internet users.

English-speaking Asian-Americans Are the Most Likely To Report Internet Usage

Year Asian, English-speaking White, non-Hispanic Hispanic Black, non-Hispanic
2000 72% 53% 46% 38%
2001 73% 57% 50% 40%
2002 73% 60% 58% 47%
2003 74% 63% 58% 50%
2004 77% 65% 61% 49%
2005 75% 70% 71% 55%
2006 85% 72% 73% 59%
2007 84% 75% 76% 64%
2008 89% 75% 74%* 63%
2009 90% 79% 68%* 69%
2010 89% 78% 71% 68%
2011 91% 81% 73% 73%
2012 95% 84% 79% 77%
2013 95% 85% 81% 79%
2014 97% 85% 81% 79%
2015 N/A 85% 81% 78%

*Note 1: In December 2008, the Pew Research Center began offering national general population surveys in both Spanish and English, helping to increase the share of Hispanics who participated and improving the representativeness of our national surveys. Those who preferred to take interviews in Spanish were more likely to be recently arrived immigrants who had somewhat lower education levels, lower household income, and less connection to some technologies compared with other Hispanics living in the U.S. This helps to explain the break in the usage rate trend among U.S. Hispanics between 2008 and 2009.

Note 2: The results reported here on Asian-Americans are limited to English speakers only. The surveys reported here were conducted only in English and Spanish. Those who speak other Asian languages but are not comfortable speaking English are less likely to respond to these phone surveys.

Note 3: The 2015 data come from a survey that does not include enough Asian-Americans to yield statistically-reliable findings.

Source: Pew Research Center surveys, 2000-2015. Asian American sample size for 2015 is too low to report.

In December 2008, Pew Research began offering all surveys of the U.S. population in Spanish as well as English. This change ensured better coverage of the national population, including more recently arrived Hispanic immigrants. More recently arrived Hispanic immigrants are more likely to have limited English ability, have lower levels of income and formal education, and have less internet experience than other Hispanics living in the U.S. Thus, we report two separate time trends for Hispanics: the first leading up to late 2008 when Pew Research Center surveys of the U.S. population were only available in English, and the second, from late 2008 onward, when all Pew Research national surveys were administered in both English and Spanish. 1

Furthermore, the trends presented here on Asian-Americans are limited to English speakers only. The respondents classified as Asian-American said in surveys that they were “Asian or Pacific Islander” when asked to identify their race. As Pew Research surveys are only offered in English and Spanish, the Asian-Americans who respond are English speakers or bilingual. Those who speak other Asian languages but are not comfortable speaking English are less likely to respond to these phone surveys. Pew Research Center does not usually report on Asian-American technology use in it reports as surveys do not typically contain enough Asian-American respondents to yield statistically reliable findings. Aggregating surveys, as is done here, does yield sufficient cases of English-speaking Asian-Americans to report the findings. 2

Internet Usage by Community Type

Adults who live in urban or suburban communities have shown consistently higher levels of internet adoption, compared with rural residents. This gap has persisted even as internet adoption has risen in all three types of communities.

Rural Citizens Are Less Likely To Use Internet

Year Urban Suburban Rural
2000 53% 56% 42%
2001 55% 59% 46%
2002 61% 63% 49%
2003 64% 65% 51%
2004 65% 67% 53%
2005 69% 70% 60%
2006 71% 73% 62%
2007 75% 77% 63%
2008 75% 77% 63%
2009 73% 76% 68%
2010 78% 79% 69%
2011 80% 82% 73%
2012 84% 84% 76%
2013 86% 85% 78%
2014 85% 85% 79%
2015 85% 85% 78%

Source: Pew Research Center surveys, 2000-2015.

In 2000, 56% of suburban residents, 53% of urban residents, and 42% of rural residents were internet users. Today those figures stand at 85%, 85%, and 78% respectively. Rural communities tend to have a higher proportion of residents who are older, lower-income, and have lower levels of educational attainment – additional factors associated with lower levels of internet adoption.

Internet Usage by Gender

Today, men and women are equally likely to be internet users, a trend that has not wavered throughout the 15 years these surveys have been conducted. However, the earliest Pew Research surveys found that men were more likely than women to be internet users. For instance, a 1995 survey found 9% of men and 4% of women had used a “modem to connect to any computer bulletin boards, information services such as Compuserve or Prodigy.”

Gender Parity Has Been the Norm In Internet Usage

Year Men Women
2000 54% 50%
2001 57% 53%
2002 61% 57%
2003 63% 60%
2004 66% 61%
2005 69% 67%
2006 72% 70%
2007 75% 73%
2008 74% 73%
2009 77% 75%
2010 77% 76%
2011 80% 78%
2012 83% 82%
2013 84% 84%
2014 84% 84%
2015 85% 84%

Source: Pew Research Center surveys, 2000-2015.

By 2000, when Pew Research began tracking internet use more consistently, 54% of men were internet users, compared with half of women. This modest gap continued, gradually shrinking until 2008 when a statistically indistinguishable 74% of men and 73% of women identified as internet users. Today, 85% of men and 84% of women report being internet users.


Green group distances itself from Paris clashes

We’ve just posted some video of the protests turning ugly in Paris:

Environmental group 350.org has issued a statement distancing itself from the violent protests:

Starting around 2:30pm, a small group of protesters unaffiliated with the climate movement arrived at Republique and began to clash with the police there, violating the nonviolent pledge that every group involved in the climate coalition here in France has agreed to. Police responded with tear gas and pepper spray. The protest dispersed by around 3:45pm.

Events on the other side of the Atlantic are underway. Here are a series of photos from Rio de Janeiro, by author Jules Boykoff:

Jules Boykoff (@JulesBoykoff)

Scenes from today's #ClimateMarch in #Rio de Janeiro (1/3) pic.twitter.com/vUxoz8qlhx

November 29, 2015
Jules Boykoff (@JulesBoykoff)

More scenes from today's #ClimateMarch in #Rio de Janeiro, #Brazil (2/3) pic.twitter.com/hvDZrVgtwR

November 29, 2015

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