HMS Cordelia

HMS Cordelia



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HMS Cordelia

HMS Cordelia was a Caroline class light cruiser that spent the First World War with the Grand Fleet, as part of the 1st Light Cruiser Squadron from January 1915-1917 and then the 4th Light Cruiser Squadron from 1917 until April 1919.

During 1915-16 she was based at Rosyth, under the overall command of Commodore Goodenough. She took part in the hunt for the German minelayer Meteor in August 1915, and in the battle of Jutland.

At Jutland her squadron was part of the battle cruiser fleet under Admiral Beatty. During the battle cruiser phase of the battle she was engaged in a fight with the German light cruisers. When Jellicoe lost touch with the German battleships after Scheer’s second turn away, the squadron was sent out in an attempt to recover contact, but without much success.

After the war HMS Cordelia served with the Devonport Gunnery School. From 1920-22 she was part of the 2nd Light Cruiser Squadron of the Atlantic Fleet, before entering the Nore Reserve, where she remained until 1930.

Displacement (loaded)

4,733t

Top Speed

28.5kts

Armour – deck

1in

- belt

3in-1in

- conning tower

6in

Length

446ft

Armaments

Two 6in Mk XII guns
Eight 4in quick firing Mk IV guns
One 13pdr anti-aircraft gun
Four 3pdr guns
Four 21in above-water torpedo tubes

Crew complement

301

Launched

23 February 1914

Completed

January 1915

Sold for break up

1930

Captains

A. V. Vyvyan (1915)
T. P. H. Beamish (1916)

Books on the First World War |Subject Index: First World War


HMS Cordelia (1914)

Alus tilattiin Pembroken telakalta, missä köli laskettiin 21. heinäkuuta 1913. Alus laskettiin vesille 23. helmikuuta 1914 ja otettiin palvelukseen tammikuussa 1915.

Palvelukseen otettaessa alus liitettiin Suuren Laivaston (engl. Grand Fleet ) 1. kevyt risteilijäviirikköön, jonka mukana alus osallistui touko-kesäkuun vaihteessa 1916 Skagerrakin taisteluun. Vuonna 1917 alus siirrettiin 4. kevyt risteilijäviirikköön, jossa alus oli huhtikuuhun 1919. [1]

Alukselle asennettiin 1919 kaksi 3 tuuman 20 cwt Mk I ilmatorjuntatykkiä. Kesäkuussa alus liitettiin Devonportin tykistökouluun ja sitten Noren reserviin. Vuoden 1920 alussa alukselta poistettiin taaempi komentosilta sekä kaikki etsintävalot. Alukselle myös asennettiin kaksi 2 naulan tykkiä keskelle alusta yläkannen takaosaan. [2]

Tammikuussa 1920 alus palautettiin palvelukseen ja liitettiin Atlantin laivaston 2. kevyt risteilijäviirikköön. Alus oli partiotehtävissä Irlannin rannikolla 1922. [1]

Cordelia poistettiin joulukuussa 1922 palveluksesta ja liitettiin Noren reserviin. Alus myytiin romutettavaksi 31. heinäkuuta 1923 Cashmorelle. [1]


Palvelukseen otettaessa alus liitettiin Suuren Laivaston (engl. Grand Fleet ) 1. kevyt risteilijäviirikköön, jonka mukana alus osallistui touko-kesäkuun vaihteessa 1916 Skagerrakin taisteluun. Vuonna 1917 alus siirrettiin 4. kevyt risteilijäviirikköön, jossa alus oli huhtikuuhun 1919. [1]

Alukselle asennettiin 1919 kaksi 3 tuuman 20 cwt Mk I ilmatorjuntatykkiä. Kesäkuussa alus liitettiin Devonportin tykistökouluun ja sitten Noren reserviin. Vuoden 1920 alussa alukselta poistettiin taaempi komentosilta sekä kaikki etsintävalot. Alukselle myös asennettiin kaksi 2 naulan tykkiä keskelle alusta yläkannen takaosaan. [2]

Tammikuussa 1920 alus palautettiin palvelukseen ja liitettiin Atlantin laivaston 2. kevyt risteilijäviirikköön. Alus oli partiotehtävissä Irlannin rannikolla 1922. [1]

Cordelia poistettiin joulukuussa 1922 palveluksesta ja liitettiin Noren reserviin. Alus myytiin romutettavaksi 31. heinäkuuta 1923 Cashmorelle. [1]


A note from Miss Fitzgerald

The Vaughan Evans Library has a beautiful collection of rare books relating to maritime history. One such book is the Life of Lord Viscount Nelson by T.O. Churchill published in 1810. Although this book is beautiful and gives a full account of Lord Nelson’s accomplishments, this particular copy is very special and it has nothing to do with the text.

Taped to the inside of the book is a handwritten note which states:

Miss Fitzgerald has much pleasure in lending this book (“Life of Lord Nelson”) to the men of H.M.S. Cordelia, during their stay at St Vincent’s Hospital, after which she will call for it. 383 Liverpool Street, Darlinghurst

Naturally, the interest of the research team at the library was piqued. Who was Miss Fitzgerald? Why were the men of the HMS Cordelia in the hospital?

The handwritten note inside Life of Lord Viscount Nelson by T.O. Churchill (1810), from Miss Fitzgerald, lending the tome to injured sailors recovering at St Vincent’s Hospital. Image: Kate Pentecost/ANMM.


Appearance [ edit | edit source ]

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Clothing [ edit | edit source ]

During high school, Cordelia dressed very femininely, not so different from Buffy's style of clothing but rather more chic and high class opposed to some of the more natural clothes Buffy wore. Her wardrobe usually consisted of expensive dresses, short skirts, high heels, pumps and various designer hand bags. [citation needed] According to Cordelia: black, silk, chiffon and spandex were her "trademarks." ⎣]

A good example was the outfit she wore when returning to school after her injury, a burgundy skirt with a matching top, leather jacket and high heels along with a black Prada bag, symbolizing her confidence in trying to regain her popularity. ⎨] She often judged others by their style in wear, criticizing Willow's outfit at one moment ⎞] and finding it hard to look at Xander when making out because of his clothing. [citation needed]

After moving to Los Angeles, Cordelia put less significance on clothing, preferring simpler outfits with jeans along with frosted eyeshadow, probably due to her money situations. A few years later, Cordelia began wearing more mature clothing including grey suits. During her possession, she had a higher preference for comfy sweaters and long dark colored coats. [citation needed]

Hair [ edit | edit source ]

Cordelia changed her hairstyle periodically. In high school, Cordelia kept long, medium brown hair and had a notable fringe in the eleventh grade. In Los Angeles, Cordelia continued with the same hair length, though it appeared darker. Cordelia eventually cut her hair down to shoulder length. ⎹]

She then cut her hair further down into a graduated bob cut with blonde highlights after being fired. ⎶] Months later, she then had short, brown chin-length hair but then changed to a blonde, layered bob cut up around the time of her ascension as higher being, but then changed brown again and short length when she was possessed. [citation needed] After her coma, Cordelia had a shoulder length, brown perm. ⎖]

As a spirit, Cordelia's hair returned to its early stages as long, straight and brown. ⎙]


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HMS Sophie

She is an unrated 14-gun brig-rigged sloop. During the French Revolutionary Wars she was captured from the Spanish by the Royal Navy and given to Aubrey. Under his command she captured several privateers and a 36-gun xebec-frigate. However she was eventually captured by a French squadron. The Sophie, as described in Master and Commander, is closely based on the genuine HMS Speedy, commanded by Thomas Lord Cochrane, closely matching her dimensions and her operational history, including her capture by a French squadron under Admiral Charles Linois in 1801. The Sophie’s most spectacular victory, the defeat and capture of the Spanish xebec-frigate Cacafeugo duplicates the historical Speedy’s capture of the Spanish El Gamo. While the two vessels share the same rig and armament, the Sophie is a quarterdeck brig, while the Speedy had only one flush deck.

The Sophie has a complement of 89 men plus Aubrey and Maturin during the majority of the action depicted in Master and Commander. Her guns were four-pounders, giving her a broadside weight of metal of 28 pounds. As captain, Aubrey had intended to add two 12-pounder bow chasers, but abandoned his goal when the installed guns damaged the Sophie.


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Corporal Karine Marie Nathasha Blais was 21 years old.

Corporal Karine Marie Nathasha Blais was from Cowansville, Quebec.

She was described as an energetic soldier who gave 100 per cent to every challenge she faced. Frank, honest and direct, she was respected by all members of her squadron. She is remembered for her sociable nature and warm smile.

On April 13, 2009, Corporal Blais was killed when her armoured vehicle struck a roadside bomb north of Kandahar City in the Shah Wali Kowt District. She had only been on the ground in Kandahar for two weeks. It was her first overseas tour of duty since enlisting in 2006. Karine is survived by her partner Hugo Girard-Blanchette, father Gino Blais, mother Josée Simard and stepfather Marco Sergerie, younger brother Billy, grandparents Laurette (Michel), Aurélie (Georges-Henri Blais), Carol (Johanne), and extended family

© Karine Marie Nathasha Blais Family

In memory of Karine Marie Nathasha Blais.

Remember, Reflect, Respect and Retell to the next generation.

Thomas Joseph Simpson добавил(-а) новое фото в альбом «Today I Remember. ».

Today I Remember… (3)
Thursday June 3, 2021

Mark Anthony Salesse, Royal Canadian Air Force
435 Transport and Rescue Squadron

December 11, 1970 - February 11, 2015

Sergeant Mark Salesse was 44 years old.

Mark enrolled in the Governor General’s Foot Guards Reserve Unit on November 6, 1989. On January 6, 1998, he joined the regular forces. In June 2006 he graduated as a Search and Rescue (SAR) Technician at CFB COMOX, British Columbia. He posted later at CFB GOOSEBAY, Labrador until the summer of 2012. Mark was with the 435 Squadron at CFB WINNIPEG, Manitoba as a Search and Rescue (SAR) Technician since August 14, 2012.

“Mark “Sal” Salesse joined Comox Valley GSAR in the spring of 2005 after completion of his SAR tech training and subsequent posting to 442 SQN.

Mark was a humble man, always quick with a smile and never very far away from a food source. Even though he brought a considerable skill set to our team, Mark thought of everyone as an equal. A giant in both stature and spirit he adopted the men and women of CVGSAR as his extended family. He took the time to get to know each one of us, devoting time with a great sense of humor, to draw out the very best in everyone around him.

Inevitably, Mark was posted to 444 Combat Support Squadron in Goose Bay Labrador in 2009 and finally 435 Squadron Transport and Rescue Squadron in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Not one to let distance get in the way, he always stayed in touch and would show up unannounced at weekly training nights whenever he was back in the Valley. During these times, Mark helped to forge a stronger relationship between 442 Sqn and CVGSAR, involving us in many unique and ambitious training events.

Mark died doing what he loved most, living the life of a SAR tech, and training in the Rockies. An avalanche swept him away during a Canadian Forces Training mission near Banff in February of 2015, leaving behind him a legacy of compassion, humbleness and excellence for others to aspire.

Comox Valley GSAR will forever mourn the loss of not only an excellent teammate, but a dear friend as well.”

Photo: Sergeant Mark Anthony Salesse

© Mark Anthony Salesse Family
© Royal Canadian Air Force

In memory of Mark Anthony Salesse.

Remember, Reflect, Respect and Retell to the next generation.

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.”

“Let us always be inspired and may the flame of remembrance within us never be extinguished.”

Thomas Joseph Simpson добавил(-а) новое фото в альбом «Today I Remember. ».

Today I Remember…
Thursday June 3, 2021

Mark Anthony Salesse, Royal Canadian Air Force
435 Transport and Rescue Squadron

December 11, 1970 - February 11, 2015

Sergeant Mark Salesse was 44 years old.

Mark enrolled in the Governor General’s Foot Guards Reserve Unit on November 6, 1989. On January 6, 1998, he joined the regular forces. In June 2006 he graduated as a Search and Rescue (SAR) Technician at CFB COMOX, British Columbia. He posted later at CFB GOOSEBAY, Labrador until the summer of 2012. Mark was with the 435 Squadron at CFB WINNIPEG, Manitoba as a Search and Rescue (SAR) Technician since August 14, 2012.

“Mark “Sal” Salesse joined Comox Valley GSAR in the spring of 2005 after completion of his SAR tech training and subsequent posting to 442 SQN.

Mark was a humble man, always quick with a smile and never very far away from a food source. Even though he brought a considerable skill set to our team, Mark thought of everyone as an equal. A giant in both stature and spirit he adopted the men and women of CVGSAR as his extended family. He took the time to get to know each one of us, devoting time with a great sense of humor, to draw out the very best in everyone around him.

Inevitably, Mark was posted to 444 Combat Support Squadron in Goose Bay Labrador in 2009 and finally 435 Squadron Transport and Rescue Squadron in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Not one to let distance get in the way, he always stayed in touch and would show up unannounced at weekly training nights whenever he was back in the Valley. During these times, Mark helped to forge a stronger relationship between 442 Sqn and CVGSAR, involving us in many unique and ambitious training events.

Mark died doing what he loved most, living the life of a SAR tech, and training in the Rockies. An avalanche swept him away during a Canadian Forces Training mission near Banff in February of 2015, leaving behind him a legacy of compassion, humbleness and excellence for others to aspire.

Comox Valley GSAR will forever mourn the loss of not only an excellent teammate, but a dear friend as well.”

Photo: Sergeant Mark Anthony Salesse

Air and ground crew members from Air Task Force - Iraq pause to observe two minutes of silence during OPERATION IMPACT on February 14, 2015, in honour of Sergeant Mark Salesse.

© Mark Anthony Salesse Family
© Royal Canadian Air Force

In memory of Mark Anthony Salesse.

Remember, Reflect, Respect and Retell to the next generation.

“They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.”

“Let us always be inspired and may the flame of remembrance within us never be extinguished.”


Service

Cordelia's keel was laid down on 21 July, 1913, at Pembroke Royal Dockyard by Mrs. Grant, wife of the Captain Superintendent. She was launched on 23 February, 1914, by the Honourable Venetia Stanley, daughter of Lord Sheffield. Construction had been hurried by overtime so that work could begin on another light cruiser, Carysfort, as quickly as possible. [8]

At the Battle of Jutland, she was part of the First Light Cruiser Squadron, screening the battlecruisers under the command of Captain Tufton P. H. Beamish. [9]

She recommissioned on 26 January, 1920 under Captain Norton Sulivan. [10]

Paid off on 1 December, 1922. [11]


HMS ‘Cordelia’

The HMS ‘Cordelia’ was a laid down in October 1855 and ready to launch in 9 months. She was launched on a fine Summer’s evening by Mrs Smart, sister-in-law of Captain Robert Smart, the Captain Superintendent at the time. HMS ‘Cordelia’ was rigged and left for Devonport, Plymouth, United Kingdom, for completion. Powered by sails rigged as a Barque, and a 2 cylinder horizontal, single-expansion engine driving a single 10 ft (3.05 m) diameter screw achieving some 10 knots in speed. The ‘Barque’, or ‘Bark’s’ main identifying feature is the rigging of the sails. The rear mast sails are rigged in line with the ship whereas the main masts are rigged with square set sails running at right angles to the line of the ship, or keel . . .

Tonnage: 578

Displacement: 861 tons

Length: 151 ft 0 in (46.02 m)

Breadth: 29 ft 8 in (9.04 m)

Depth: 15 ft 10 in (4.83 m)

Armament: 11 x 32 pdr (15 kg) Guns

Timeline:

July 1856 → launched

11th April 1857 → commissioned for the East Indies Station under the command of Commander Charles Egerton Harcourt-Vernon. Interestingly, Point Vernon on Queensland’s Fraser Coast was named after Commander Vernon . . .

6th June 1857 → sailed

30th July to 10th August 1857 → at Simons Bay, South Africa

September / October 1857 → stopped off Kuria Muria – a group of 5 islands situate off the coast of Oman, in the Arabian Sea – due to a dispute over mining Guano (a highly prized organic fertiliser)

November / December 1857 → stopped in Bombay, (now Mumbai) India

January / February 1858 → back to Kuria Muria, Oman

March / April 1858 → back to Mumbai, India

29th May to 12th June 1858 → Trincomalee, Sri Lanka

28th July 1858 → arrived in Sydney, Australia

21st August 1858 → departed Sydney, Australia

September / December 1858 → stopped at Navigators’ Islands, Savaii, Samoa – to attend to capture and trial of the William Fox’ murderer

6th January 1859 → arrived in Sydney, Australia

15th February 1859 → departed Sydney, Australia

17th February to 20th February 1859 → stopped in Newcastle, Australia

21st February to 6th April 1859 → stopped in Sydney, Australia

18th April to 16th June 1859 → stopped in Sydney, Australia

June 1859 → stopped in Norfolk Island

8th July to 6th August 1859 → stopped in Sydney, Australia

August 1859 → stopped in New Caledonia

25th September to 12th October 1859 → stopped in Sydney, Australia

October / November 1859 → stopped in Fiji

August 1859 → stopped in New Caledonia

25th November to 3rd December 1859 → stopped in Sydney, Australia

December 1859 → travelled to Melbourne & Brisbane, Australia

January 1860 → stopped in Brisbane, Australia

19th February to 6th April 1860 → stopped in Sydney, Australia

In March 1860, the ‘First Taranaki War’ broke out between the Maori and New Zealand Government over land ownership and sovereignty, on New Zealand’s North Island. More than 3,500 imperial troops, plus volunteer and unprofessional soldiers were transported from Australia, to fight against the Maoris with the war ending in a ceasefire in the March of 1861 . . .

17th April 1860 → landed armed personnel at Taranaki, New Zealand

April / May 1860 → bombaded enemy positions at Warea, Taranaki, New Zealand

May 1860 to February 1861 → shuttled men, weapons, despatches & mail between Wellington, Taranaki, Manukau & Auckland, New Zealand. Acting Commander Francis Hume assumed command in the January of 1861

22nd March to 7th May 1861 → stopped in Sydney, Australia

22nd May 1861 → arrived in New Plymouth, New Zealand

23rd June 1861 → departed Auckland, New Zealand

15th to 20th July 1861 → stopped in Sydney, Australia

August / September 1861 → Saint Ysabel Island, Solomons to investigate a report of a white child being kidnapped by locals, which proved to be false

6th to 17th October 1861 → stopped at Auckland, New Zealand

31st October to 23rd November 1861 → stopped in Sydney, Australia

24th November 1861 → sailed for England

New Years Eve 1861 → rounded Cape Horn, Chile

4th to 15th January 1862 → stopped in Port Stanley, Falkland Islands

24th March 1862 → stopped arrived in Plymouth, United Kingdom

2nd April 1862 → HMS ‘Cordelia’ was ‘paid off’, i.e. decommissioned from service whereby the crew were no longer needed and therefore no longer had a job, unless, they were lucky enough to be assigned to another crew . . .

24th June 1864 to July 1868 → HMS ‘Cordelia’ was recommissioned under the command of Commander John Binney Scott to serve in the North American and West Indies Stations.

3rd March 1865 → Commander Thomas Alexis De Wahl assumed command due to Commander Scott becoming invalided

16th September 1867 → Commander Charles Parry assumed command

9th July 1868 → HMS ‘Cordelia’ was ‘paid off’, in Plymouth, United Kingdom

12th May 1870 → HMS ‘Cordelia’ was sold for breaking up at Plymouth, United Kingdom

View other important events in the history of Australia’s Shipping . . .


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